Aged Dahongpao

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong
Flavors
Not available
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Loose Leaf, Tea Bag
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Christina / BooksandTea
Average preparation
Not available

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The Aged DHP was a lot smoother overall than the fresh. The dry leaves were long, dark, and spindly, and they smelled like wood, cigarettes, and roastedness. I also smelled a hint of something...” Read full tasting note
  • “This tea was from the monthly White2tea club that Christina and I are sharing. They put some fresh Dahongpao in to try before and after having this one. It was for learning purposes only so I am...” Read full tasting note

From White2Tea

This tea has calmed over the course of the last 8 years. The tea is somewhat fragmented, and the fine flavours have subsided to leave a mellow mineral tea behind. Thick body, deep content, and flowing smoothness. Retail vendors in China often sell this exact tea as 15 years according to the farmer.

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2 Tasting Notes

987 tasting notes

The Aged DHP was a lot smoother overall than the fresh. The dry leaves were long, dark, and spindly, and they smelled like wood, cigarettes, and roastedness. I also smelled a hint of something salty at the back of my nose, like soy sauce.

After a 5-second rinse with 90°C water, the smell of the leaves deepened into cigars and charred wood, but I didn’t get the burnt sugar/burnt pie crust sensation that I got from the Fresh DHP.

The first steep resulted in tea that was an ochre colour — much redder than the Fresh DHP. The fragrance was light, but sharper and woodier than the fresh stuff. Again, I couldn’t sense any burnt notes. This tea was definitely smoother, but there was a more alkaline aftertaste, especially on the backs and sides of my tongue.

[…]

What I find interesting is that White2Tea described this tea as “mineral.” I can see that, though I think what they consider “mineral” was what I was describing as flowers/sandalwood.

Full review at http://booksandtea.ca/2015/08/white2tea-august-2015-subscription-box-clover-patch-oolong-and-2-da-hong-paos/

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661 tasting notes

This tea was from the monthly White2tea club that Christina and I are sharing. They put some fresh Dahongpao in to try before and after having this one. It was for learning purposes only so I am leaving my review of both with this one.

The fresh dahongpao was really sharp and strong of roast. I couldn’t pick out too much about the actual tea because the roast was just so strong. I can see why this tea is normally not sold so fresh. The wet leaves had a strong aroma of roast too.

The aged dahongpao has really mellowed. There’s the roast, still there but not in your face so much. it still has a good strong roast but it is smoother. I had a few infusions of this trying to figure out why some people love this. I just couldn’t pick up other notes even though the roast had mellowed. I don’t know how to rate this tea. It just isn’t my own personal preference; but I enjoyed trying it out, and comparing the fresh with the aged.

Rich

I tried this today. It reminded me of a good whiskey!

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