Rougui Oolong

Tea type
Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Chocolate, Floral, Mineral, Roasted, Sweet, Wood
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Matu
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 2 oz / 60 ml

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  • “I bought a small sample packet of this tea with one of my Aliexpress 11/11 orders. It is my first Rou Gui oolong, so I have little to offer in terms of evaluating relative quality. It was a...” Read full tasting note

From Wuyi Star

Rou Gui oolong tea is one of famous Wuyi Cliff Tea from Wuyi Mountain of Fu Jian.Wuyi Cliff Oolong has long, curly leaves resembling iron shards. The leaves are hand-rolled into the traditional twisted Yan Cha form and pan-fired at their aromatic peak to arrest oxidation. Afterwards they are charcoal-fired in small batches to produce the deep green color and rich flavor that have made this tea one of China’s most famous tea. The aroma of the dry leaf is deliciously sweet while the dark amber infusion is soft, smooth and malt.Rou Gui is famous for its lingering and rich flowery aroma, being so good that you will be captivated before you even drink the tea. The infusion produces cups of strong, amber-colored beverage.

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1 Tasting Note

486 tasting notes

I bought a small sample packet of this tea with one of my Aliexpress 11/11 orders. It is my first Rou Gui oolong, so I have little to offer in terms of evaluating relative quality. It was a decently tasty yancha though. The dry leaves had a creamy, dark chocolate aroma. After a rinse, that was all overwhelmed by a pretty serious roasty, maybe even charred, smell.

I could definitely taste the roast, especially in the early steeps, but it didn’t come across as overpowering or sour or any of the unpleasant things roastiness can do. The tea had a mineral and ever so slightly woody sweetness and left my mouth feeling the opposite of dry. I know the opposite of dry is wet, but it sounded weird to say it left my mouth wet…so, it was mouthwatering I guess. Rou Gui oolongs are known to have a bit of a cinnamon flavor to them apparently – I think I may have noticed a bit of that in the woody part of the flavor, but there is a good chance I only tasted that flavor because I was looking for it based upon prior knowledge.

The tea also developed what might have been a bit of a floral flavor, and on occasion the chocolatey notes I smelled on the dry leaves came though in the flavor, though never strongly.

I wasn’t particularly wowed by this tea, but it was tasty. It will be a good point of comparison when I try some higher end Rou Gui oolongs. I’ve got one or two of those laying around. Not sure whether I would recommend it or not at this point, though!

Flavors: Chocolate, Floral, Mineral, Roasted, Sweet, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 2 OZ / 60 ML
tanluwils

I know what you mean by that “opposite of dry” sensation. I suppose it’s more like a salivating reflex. I get that from many yanchas. It sounds like this one could use a year or two of resting/aging for it to come into its own.

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