2015 Yunnan Sourcing Da Hu Sai Raw Pu-erh

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Bitter, Citrus, Floral, Fruity, Sweet, Cedar, Pear, Spices
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Ubacat
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 5 oz / 144 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

1 Want it Want it

3 Own it Own it

6 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I really enjoyed this sheng. Definitely bitter/astringent at the beginning but that ebbs a bit into a lingering sweetness via strong huigan. There is a touch of citrus in the flavor I think with a...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “I’ve decided to stop ‘rating’ teas with numbers since they mean nothing to anyone but me. It’s hard to review teas during periods of irregular weather. This one is no exception. It was only after...” Read full tasting note
  • “I’ve gotten spoiled with some of the amazing young shengs out there that do not have much (or none at all) bitterness. I decided to try this one this morning before work instead of my usual green...” Read full tasting note
    56
  • “Starting out, the dry leaf had a strong dried apricot aroma, which turned into sweet hay once wet. The soup transitioned from baking spices to a muted cedar aroma before plateauing with a buttery...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

Our second Spring Da Hu Sai production is from the Da Zhong Mountain area. Da Zhong Mountain has the oldest tea trees in the Da Hu Sai area, ranging from 120-200 years in age. It is also the highest altitude area in Da Hu Sai. Steep hillsides with good drainage and sun exposure gives this tea a strong vibrant taste and cha qi. The tea trees are growing naturally, and no pesticides or artificial fertilizers are used!

The Da Hu Sai village tea is strong with fast mouth-watering effect. The taste is thick with both astringent and bitter character that stays in the mouth and is gradually replace by a sweet syrupy thickness. The mouth feel is strong and stays for a long time after drinking. Da Zhong Mountain tea especially is quite bitter up front with less astringency at the tail-end than most Lincang old abor

Vintage: April 2014 material

Quantity: 200 cakes in total produced (80 kg)

Area: Da Hu Sai village, Bang Dong county, Lincang Prefecture

This tea has been tested in a certified laboratory and has passed the MRL limits for pesticide residues as established by the EU Food and Safety commission. For more information about MRL testing and the EU Food and Safety commission click on this link.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

6 Tasting Notes

85
34 tasting notes

I really enjoyed this sheng. Definitely bitter/astringent at the beginning but that ebbs a bit into a lingering sweetness via strong huigan. There is a touch of citrus in the flavor I think with a very nice floral/fruity aroma. The mouthfeel of this tea is awesome. The bitterness works on the saliva glands and really gets things going. It has a thick body and really hit the spot for me this morning. There are also some elements of cooling/herbal sensations from the tea. I’m thinking about getting a cake of this. I think it will be interesting to try over time.

Flavors: Bitter, Citrus, Floral, Fruity, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 110 ML
kevdog19

Sounds great! I’ve heard really good reviews on this one, sill have to try it soon.

Matt Warren

I highly recommend it! Love the aftertaste.

tanluwils

I got a cake. It’s quite different from Scott’s Jinggu cakes. More upfront bitterness and cooling/numbing together, which I like a lot.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

143 tasting notes

I’ve decided to stop ‘rating’ teas with numbers since they mean nothing to anyone but me. It’s hard to review teas during periods of irregular weather. This one is no exception. It was only after trying this tea 4 times using both a gaiwan and yixing over a week after it arrived was I able to pick out its true character.

Dried leaves smell like sweet grass while wet leaves are floral and musky. They are largely intact, veiny, large, and very green. Initial steeps are straight up bitterness with some hints of high floral notes, and vegetal notes of grilled asparagus and raw brussel sprouts. This is a powerful tea. Strong energy up front that eventually calms down going into the 5th brew. Nice mouth feel, superb huigan, and very persistent aftertaste. It’s obvious this will age into something interesting.

In mid-steeps, the bitterness while still there gradually is replaced by thick sweetness—the brown sugar type. The tea remains thick, textured, sweet-medicinal and vegetal until it finally gives out—by then I’ve lost count of steeps. This of course varies according to your brewing parameters.

Ubacat

I know what you mean about rating teas yet I continue to do it because it gives me a quick look of what I like in my cupboard.

tanluwils

Makes sense, but since I often look at reviews before making purchases I find these numbers quite misleading since my 80 is someone else’s 70.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

56
661 tasting notes

I’ve gotten spoiled with some of the amazing young shengs out there that do not have much (or none at all) bitterness.

I decided to try this one this morning before work instead of my usual green tea. It was just too much bitterness to me. Yes a bit of fruity apricot but I couldn’t get past the bitterness. I imagine it probably would have gotten better after quite a few steeps but I didn’t have time this morning. I usually don’t have an untried tea as my first cup and on this day I was disappointed I did. The first cup of the day has to be one I love.

boychik

lower temp and super fast steeps, like few secs

JC

+1 Plus it is very young let it air for a bit and if you have a full cake age it for a year or two.

Ubacat

I only had a sample of this but I suppose I could have lowered the temperature a little more. I was using around 85-90 C . I did do some really short steeps (under 10 sec) but it was consistently bitter.

tanluwils

I admit I wasn’t a fan of the 2014 version of this tea when I first opened the sample, but it’s had over a week to air out, as in flakes of leaves are separated in a ziplock bag, and now it tastes like a totally different tea. It actually reminds me of a Lao Man’E I had in Beijing last summer. I’m plan to write a tasting note on it tonight.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

21 tasting notes

Starting out, the dry leaf had a strong dried apricot aroma, which turned into sweet hay once wet. The soup transitioned from baking spices to a muted cedar aroma before plateauing with a buttery baked pear flavor. There was a spike of bitterness around steep four, but that quickly disappeared and left a syrupy and gentle infusion. I really enjoyed this teas flavors and was happy to take it to 15 steeps before it trailed off.

Flavors: Cedar, Pear, Spices

Preparation
6 g 6 OZ / 177 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

987 tasting notes

First note for this tea!

I did some gong-fu steeping for this last night: 6g, 130mL gaiwan, 90C water, 5-second rinse.

The flavour and smell were pretty typical for a young sheng – tart, fruity, a bit smoky. I noticed that this had some bitterness in the first few steeps, but it was a sharp, thin bitterness, rather than the kind of juicy bitterness with a fruity aftertaste that I noticed in the Gu Shu from a few days ago. I prefer the Gu Shu kind of bitterness a lot more.

Ginkosan

Uhhh from what I understand this is gushu. Site says 120-200yr old trees.

Ginkosan

Gottcha. I’m not sure why Scott labels some of his cakes Gushu and others not, my understanding was that anything over 100 years could be considered gushu, but my understanding may be flawed…

tanluwils

Scott mentioned in one of his Q&A videos that gu shu is typically defined as any tea tree older than 100 years. In Chinese, the term ‘gu shu’ is often used interchangeably with ‘lao shu’ and ‘bai nian shu’ (100 year-old tree) and generally also refers to any tree older than 100 years. So, according to pu’er tea industry standards, what we have here is ‘gu shu’ material.

Also, not all gu shu cha is bitter—the Qing Mei Shan and Huang Shan from Scott’s 2015 line are great examples, and happen to be my favorite so far.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.