Gyokuro

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Asparagus, Hay, Jasmine, Sweet, warm grass, Umami
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Miss Starfish
Average preparation
155 °F / 68 °C 1 min, 0 sec 8 oz / 250 ml

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  • “Dry leaf smells great; vegetal and sweet. The liquor is a light, vibrant green. Aroma of sweet baby asparagus and hay. Wow. This is really good. It’s like a sweeter version of sencha. But...” Read full tasting note
    82

From Zen Tea

A fine and expensive type of shaded green tea from Japan. Tea leaves for Gyokuro are grown in the shade for 20 to 30 days before harvest, which differs from the standard sencha in being grown under the shade rather than the full sun.
Gyokuro has a noble mellow and sweet taste, an elegant aroma, and a light green colour. Gyokuro will undoubtedly enhance your sense of green tea.
Gyokuro was developed at Uji, in Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan. Among many regional varieties of Gyokuro, which is the finest grade of Japanese tea, Uji Gyokuro is said to be the best.

Origin: Uji, Kyoto, Japan

About Zen Tea View company

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1 Tasting Note

82
100 tasting notes

Dry leaf smells great; vegetal and sweet.

The liquor is a light, vibrant green. Aroma of sweet baby asparagus and hay. Wow. This is really good. It’s like a sweeter version of sencha. But calling it sweet isn’t quite right, as it’s still savoury. It’s hard to describe. This tea starts on a sweet delicate note, and then quickly crescendos with a strong (but it’s not a “loud” kind of strong, it’s more of a depth?) sencha flavour, before rounding down with punctuated mellow notes of grass, baby jasmine and umami.

Also, I read online that a lot of people eat the leaves, so I tried that tentatively (As a small child I also tried eating a rabbit dropping after my father convinced me it was a raisin. It was not a raisin. Granted that is neither here nor there, but will hopefully serve as an amusement at my expense). Leaf report: I think there was some water left in with the leaves, so they’re a bit bitter. But I enjoyed the texture and if I had Ponzu on hand to add to them, I bet they’d be quite yum!

Flavors: Asparagus, Hay, Jasmine, Sweet, warm grass, Umami

Preparation
155 °F / 68 °C 1 min, 0 sec 2 tsp 8 OZ / 250 ML
TeaNecromancer

that sounds very much like something my dad would have done to me!

Ponzu is super yummy on the leaves, I have also sprinkled some furikake on it which made it really tasty, reminded me of a really mild seaweed salad

Miss Starfish

Thanks for the rec Amanda, I’ll pick some up! :)

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