Muzha Tieguanyin - 2005

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Aiko
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  • “I was looking through my tea cabinet for something interesting when I came across a small green sealed package simply labeled "Muzha Tieguanyin 2005" I don't even remember where this came from, or...” Read full tasting note
    53
    Amaikokonut 53 tasting notes

From Floating Leaves

This Muzha Tiequanyin was produced back in 2005 and has been roasted in a yearly basis. The rinsed leaves smells of raisin/prune and it also remind me of rye bread kind of sourness. With more brewing, a nice sweetness will show up and one will not miss the warm roasting note. It has that typical Tiequanyin metallic note.

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1 Tasting Note

53
53 tasting notes

I was looking through my tea cabinet for something interesting when I came across a small green sealed package simply labeled “Muzha Tieguanyin 2005” I don’t even remember where this came from, or how long I’ve had it (I really ought to keep track of this stuff), but I thought what the hey, I love oolongs, I love tieguanyin, I may as well try it!

I was a bit surprised, to be honest, by the roasty aroma and the very dark, nearly black leaves, I’m not sure I’ve ever had a roasted oolong before, so this was going to be a new experience. for me; I wasn’t sure what to expect.

I had already temped the water at around 175, as I wasn’t expecting such a dark, roasty tea. A couple steepings at this temperature and I quickly learned that wasn’t going to work— I was going to need to reboil the water to pull the full flavors from this one. After that, the roasted flavors sort became much stronger; reminded me of very much of houjicha (but with much less astringency). Rather warm and soothing, but I was a little disappointed that throughout the whole session the flavor remained exactly the same, the strong roasted flavor overshadowing any other flavors the tea might have had.

I wonder, is this typical of roasted oolongs? If so, I’m not sure they fall under my favorites. I have enough left for another session, so maybe next time I’ll brew it alongside my staple houjicha and see if I can find any other flavors under all that roasty-toastiness.

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