2000 Zhong-Cha Kumming “Lan Tie”

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by jenny wren
Average preparation
Not available

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “I ordered a one ounce sample of this, but it doesn't seem to be available anymore. Here is a link to a blog post about the tea: http://houdeblog.com/?p=140 This is the first sheng puerh I have...” Read full tasting note
    jenny-wren 6 tasting notes

From Hou De Asian Art & Fine Teas

Product description not available yet.

About Hou De Asian Art & Fine Teas View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

6 tasting notes

I ordered a one ounce sample of this, but it doesn’t seem to be available anymore. Here is a link to a blog post about the tea: http://houdeblog.com/?p=140

This is the first sheng puerh I have tasted. The aroma puts me in mind of wood, smoke, earth, creosote. The flavor is brisk, woody, smoky, herbaceous. Full bodied but not as thick as I was expecting. Creates almost a physical sensation at back of throat. Very lingering flavor.

This definitely intrigues me…I can’t wait to try more sheng puerh.

In addition: I have had this twice, and both times felt a tad queasy after the second cup. This feeling went away after a minute or two, replaced by a very settled feeling. Has anyone else had this experience?

argus

That feeling you experienced was ‘cha qi’ or as we refer to it ‘you were teadrunk’. Bigger cha qi means better tea (atleast for some)

Login or sign up to leave a comment.