2007 Winter Feng Huang Wu Dong Old Bush Dan Cong "Ba Xian"

Tea type
Oolong Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by the_skua
Average preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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  • “I'm adding a footnote to a previous tasting note. Today I brewed this using what I understand to be the brewing method of the Chao Zhou region, which is to fill a small pot (120 ml max) almost full...” Read full tasting note
    90
    deftea 24 tasting notes
  • “Received as a three-DanCong sampler, this tea was actually my first DanCong, so my impressions may not be entirely valid. Regardless, I enjoyed this tea, although the overall flavor seemed a little...” Read full tasting note
    93
    the_skua 207 tasting notes

From Hou De Asian Art & Fine Teas

Harvest: 2007 Winter

Method: Hand-harvesting

Location: Wu Dong, Feng Huang county, Guang Dong

Fermentation/Roasting: 25% / light wood roasting

Description: This precious dancong is from old bushes (avg 40 years old) of the Wu Dong plantation area of Feng Huang county. The dry leaves are complete, tight, and loooong!

The focus of this dancong was to express the ethereal and elegant floral fragrance of the Winter hand-harvested leaves from vigorous old bushes of a higher elevation plantation. The floral scent has the impression of both gardenia and orchid. The Winter season infused the leaves with an additional layer of creamy and honey aroma. Just enough wood roasting smartly caramelized the complex components of aroma while retained the ethereal and refreshing quality.

Liquor is delightful golden-yellow with a remarkable clarity. Taste is refined, with a hint of bitterness going deep in the throat and quickly changing to lingering and comfortable after-taste.

About Hou De Asian Art & Fine Teas View company

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3 Tasting Notes

90
24 tasting notes

I’m adding a footnote to a previous tasting note. Today I brewed this using what I understand to be the brewing method of the Chao Zhou region, which is to fill a small pot (120 ml max) almost full with leaves. Don’t crush the leaves, but use as much as the pot will hold. Rinse twice as quickly as possible; it needs two for the leaves to open. Then fill the pot with water and immediately pour the tea. Don’t let it “steep” for more than a breath. You can reinfuse many, many times, so this way is no more expensive than using less leaves.
This tea was so good my head almost popped off. It actually compelled me to smile!
My understanding of the chemistry of this is that the leaves never get as hot as the temperature of the water. No risk of too much astringency (which is a concern with Dan Congs). And yet, you get a blast of tea oils nevertheless. And the aroma was strikingly more fragrant and different than before. Much more flowery (magnolia?) rather than just peachy, though peach is still there, too. Very full in the mouth.
I may also use this as an excuse to purchase another, smaller pot. Hehehe.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 15 sec
the_skua

I had this experience with Hou De’s mid-90s Dan Cong. I had brewed it for a long time with maybe only a half a gaiwan full and thought it was good, but nothing to get crazy about. Then, I decided to stuff it to the brim and give it fast infusions as you say…wow. Much different, much more enjoyable.

deftea

You think it’s just Dan Cong that works like this? What would Yancha do? Or Sheng Puerh? We should try them. Let’s try them.

deftea

Oooh. I don’t think it transfers so easily. I think degree of roasting is key factor. Roasting of Dan Cong and Rou Gui types seem to work. Lower roasting doesn’t like this method so much. So far.

the_skua

What did you try? My experience with sheng puerh is that it just gets overly potent and unbalanced. Shou pu, actually works, because there’s no bitterness to over-accumulate.

deftea

Yes, you’re right, I tried a trusted Sheng for Pure Puerh. The astringency overpowered any floral aromas or honey flavors. Maybe I’ll post more detail. Maybe I’ll try shou pu. Post your experiments, OK?

the_skua

Not really experimenting, as I’m pretty certain this only works with heavily roasted oolongs, based on experience and the trial and error of others.

Thomas Smith

I frequently go this route with Yan Cha as well. Sort of scares folks I serve tea to, but yummilicious results!

the_skua

I did stuff my ~120mL gaiwan with 12.5g of 2008 Menghai Da Yi Hong ripe puerh this morning. It works fairly well. Potent stuff, kind of like grain espresso. I would hate to try it with a shupu that still had a lot of fermentation aroma, though. That’s the nice thing about Menghai shu that’s a few years old, it’s relatively clean.

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93
207 tasting notes

Received as a three-DanCong sampler, this tea was actually my first DanCong, so my impressions may not be entirely valid. Regardless, I enjoyed this tea, although the overall flavor seemed a little light. I used around 3grams in my 3oz gaiwan. Started with 20s, 30s, and 40s steeps, then just went by intuition. The aroma was very snappy and complex. A lot of woody spiciness, fresh mums and peonies. The depth of the flavor and aroma held a very creamy super-fresh pink shrimp meat character. A bit of old bay, and creole seasoning popped up in the back of the throat. It gave out around the fourth or fifth steep. Nicely sweet.

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