2007 Da Hong Pao by Hui Yuan Yan Cha Tea Factory

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Char, Cinnamon, Creamy, Roasted
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Gingko (manager of Life in Teacup)
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “As a tea seller, whether or not the business is successful, I’ve got to count my blessings for all the tea I’ve tasted in name of business. :-D I didn’t set out to look for this tea but it was...” Read full tasting note
    gingko 42 tasting notes
  • “Sweet and pungent . . . black cherry chocolate in the wet leaf aroma that gives way to burnt bittersweet florals in the liquor. This is an excellent example of "rock tea" (yan cha) because, amidst...” Read full tasting note
    78
    robc22 144 tasting notes
  • “Da Hong Pao is always such a pleasure for me. This may only be the third or fourth one I've had. I am immediately greeted by aromas of roast, cinnamon, cream, sugar, and cannabis. There's a hint...” Read full tasting note
    80
    ShiningLion 127 tasting notes

From Life In Teacup

A high fire Da Hong Pao made by Hui Yuan Yan Cha Tea Factory, a highly reputable Yan Cha factory whose tea leaves are all from Hui Yuan Cliff in Central Wuyi Region.

Packed in certified boxes in January 2008.

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3 Tasting Notes

As a tea seller, whether or not the business is successful, I’ve got to count my blessings for all the tea I’ve tasted in name of business. :-D

I didn’t set out to look for this tea but it was an accidental encounter. Then I took all this tea from the supplier who showed it to me. Hui Yuan Yan Cha Tea Factory is a highly reputable factory in Wuyi Region. It’s named after Hui Yuan Cliff, where it’s located and all its tea leaves are from. I didn’t have much experience about their tea, but heard of this factory for so many times. So it was absolutely an exciting moment when I saw this tea.

It is a high fire roasted Da Hong Pao, made in 2008. The dry leaves don’t look as pretty as some medium fire Yan Cha, since roasting will always crush some tea leaves. The leaves don’t smell of much fire, due to the one year of rest.

I filled a 50ml small gaiwan with probably 4-5g leaves. As usual, I gave the tea a super short warm-up infusion, and as usually, I drank the warm-up infusion (while it’s often called “wash water” by people and most people won’t drink it). It already bore strong flavor. So the next, I made the first a few infusions roughly 10 sec. each.

The liquor is in a bright red color and the color is quite consistent in the first 7-8 infusions. What’s great about a rested, high-fire Yan Cha like this one is, it hits your throat strong without letting your mouth feel the fire. The liquor has slightly thick texture and leaves a sweet aftertaste in my mouth from the first infusion. The flavor feels heavy on the back part of the tongue and the throat, but it gives a lighter note at the end. In Wuyi, people describe good Yan Cha as having “the character of a rock and the fragrance of flower”. It’s an amazingly proper description!

I am extremely happy with this tea. That being said, I don’t drink tea of this level every day. This is a relative expensive tea in our store. Most of the days I am happy with inexpensive teas. To me, part of the fun is tasting teas of different levels and comparing them back and forth.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec
Lion

Hi Gingko! I also did not rinse this tea when I had it. The first infusion was very good. Unless I am making a Dark or Puer tea I do not rinse my teas, even with the tightly rolled oolongs. I find teas always have quite a unique flavor on the first infusion that is different from all the other infusions, unless you rinse first… If you do, you get similar flavors but different arranging of flavors, and while some different ones may emerge throughout the steepings, you’ve sometimes already missed the unique ones present in that first infusion.

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78
144 tasting notes

Sweet and pungent . . . black cherry chocolate in the wet leaf aroma that gives way to burnt bittersweet florals in the liquor. This is an excellent example of “rock tea” (yan cha) because, amidst the sweet, chocolaty subtlety, the mineral core is undisguised and prevalent. Delicious. Rock.

Later steeps lighten the tone considerably and the deep sweetness transforms into delicate florals and pit fruit. The underlying latticework of the Yan Cha is further exposed to be refined and minimalist.

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80
127 tasting notes

Da Hong Pao is always such a pleasure for me. This may only be the third or fourth one I’ve had. I am immediately greeted by aromas of roast, cinnamon, cream, sugar, and cannabis. There’s a hint of pepper in the scent of the wet leaves. Might sound like I’m baking up some “magic snickerdoodles”, but I assure you this is far more magicaler. ;P

The flavor of the brew is stronger than the aroma. There’s a healthy dose of tanginess and tannin up front with undertones of mushroom and damp forest wood but the flavor falls off into a sweet roasty creme brulee kind of flavor thing that lingers in your mouth for a long time. It gets sweeter as it cools. The scent in the empty cup is very much like cinnamon with hints of creamy vanilla pudding.

The second infusion is more complex, less tangy, more dark and hearty. The tones of mushroom are more evident, and there’s an autumn spice kind of thing going on that reminds me of chrysanthemum. That roasted taste really sticks to the walls of your mouth, but man is it good. It finishes clean, certainly not dirty. The third infusion is more mellow yet and the flavors are creamy, roast, soft, with nice spice notes still reminding me of chrysanthemum. This is pretty good stuff. Not mind-blowing Da Hong Pao, but a good one!

Flavors: Char, Cinnamon, Creamy, Roasted

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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