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Tie Luo Han

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Jillian
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I ordered this over 2 months ago. Wasn't until now that I decided to write a note about. This was my first Tie Lou Han, description on the website is pretty interesting, "A strong, rich and...” Read full tasting note
    66
    TeeMike 57 tasting notes
  • “I've written about this one before, as having not a huge amount of flavour to it, but it helps if it's allowed to sit for a little while. This morning I have tried making it in a gaiwan gong fu...” Read full tasting note
    65
    Angrboda 1190 tasting notes

From TeaSpring

Tie Luo Han is one of the Famous Five Wuyi Rock Teas and also believed to be the earliest Wu Yi tea; with history records dating back to Song Dynasty. The tea bush was first found in a cave (Gui Dong or Ghost Cave) in Hui Yuan Yan, one of the ninety-nine cliffs of Mount Wu Yi. Legend tells that this tea was created by a powerful warrior monk with golden-bronze skin, hence the name Tie Luo Han, which means “Iron Warrior Monk”.

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3 Tasting Notes

66
57 tasting notes

I ordered this over 2 months ago. Wasn’t until now that I decided to write a note about. This was my first Tie Lou Han, description on the website is pretty interesting, “A strong, rich and full-bodied tea that will warm your body and energize your mind.” I was honestly intrigued but the end result was a little disappointing. I have since tried other Tie Lou Han’s so I feel better writing about it now.

>Dry Leaf Appearance/Aroma
Short curled dark leaves. Lots of broken pieces and some dust. Light charcoal aroma.

>Brewing Method
Gaiwan, Gong-fu style, boiling water, one rinse. Brewed 5 times.

>Liquid Apperance
Clear amber.

>Taste/Aroma
This tea has a very faint smell of rocks and charcoal. The tea has a strong charcoal taste with a medium body in the first cups, which then fades into very subtle cocoa notes.

Starting from he 3rd cup, the tea became lighter in taste, but other than that no noticeable changes from here onward.

4th and 5th cup followed the same pattern, loss of taste with no changes in texture or new flavors. I honestly got tired of it, so I ended the session there.

>Wet Leaf Appearance
Nothing out of the ordinary, dark leaves, mostly broken.

>Overall
If someone had told me this was a cheap wuyi oolong I would’ve believed it. The description of this tea really intrigued me so I was expecting something more, this one just feels like a cheap overly toasted da hong pao. Does this mean it’s a bad tea? no way. Despite the letdown, I did enjoy this tea, it’s just not amazing or has anything that makes it stand out.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec

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65
1190 tasting notes

I’ve written about this one before, as having not a huge amount of flavour to it, but it helps if it’s allowed to sit for a little while.
This morning I have tried making it in a gaiwan gong fu style (or an approximate of gong fu, since I’m not sure I’m doing it entirely right). The aroma is strong and spicy when brewed this way, and the flavour is too. I haven’t quite got the hang of steeping it, so it’s a little oversteeped and slightly bitter, but not so much that you can’t tell what it’s supposed to be like. Strong, spicy and nutty. It’s actually a much better tea when brewed this way.

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