Fall Pear Mountain (Lishan) Oolong B

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Butter, Corn Husk, Floral, Fruity, Herbaceous, Herbs, Honeysuckle, Osmanthus, Peach, Sugarcane, Sweet, Apricot, Astringent, Broccoli, Citrus, Cookie, Cream, Grass, Honey, Kale, Orange, Orchid, Spinach, Vegetal, Jasmine, Strawberry
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by LuckyMe
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 3 oz / 94 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Drafting this note as I drink the tea. I drew from Leafhoppers and Lucky Me notes, and well, sense and instinct. I’ll add more as I drink it throughout the day, so expect some changes and...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “In 2019, I bought a sample set of two fall Li Shan oolongs picked several days apart on the same farm. This is the one that was harvested later in the year. I steeped 6 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot...” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “Mountain Stream Teas offers 3 different grades of this Li Shan. All of them sourced from the same farm and processed the same, but on different days. The earlier the picking the better the tea is...” Read full tasting note
    86

From Mountain Stream Teas

A favorite of this company and for many of our customers, our freshly finished Fall Pear Mountain Oolong 2020 is ready to be shipped!

A frost event this spring gave the tea plants on Lishan some damage but they have bounced back stronger than ever! This year’s Fall pick is great. So great in fact, that we decided to buy a bunch of it and pass those cost savings onto you! Until mid of September we are currently offering 1kg of Fall Pear Mountain A for only $150, shipping included. Smaller sizes are of course on offer as well.

We are also offering all three processing days but A was the clear winner for us. These are all teas picked from the same garden by the same pickers and processed by the same tea master, just on different days. The days were:

A — Picked August 8th, best all around ‘fall pick’ feel. Rich, smooth and fresh.

B — Picked August 14th, full thick fruit notes but lacking the round completeness of A

C — Picked August 10th, hits the taste points of more bitterness and astringency in it strength

You can see the options to sample the teas below and see if you agree with our choice!

This Pear Mountain Oolong has all the markers of a world class tea, except for the price point. Clear vegetal beginnings give way to the thick buttery mid mouth and finishes with a sweet stone fruit that lingers on the palate for hours. The classic butter mouthfeel of high mountain Taiwanese oolongs is enhanced by the beautiful flavors of this 2000m high terroir. This tea is the Fall pick so the flavors are richer, more buttery and stronger than the other seasons.

Elevation: 2000m

Status: Tested Agrochemical Free

Cultivar: QinXin

Oxidization: 20-30%

Season: August 10th(A), 11th©, 14th(B), 2020

Method: Hand picked, processed on site, small batch

Region: Lishan(Pear Mountain), Nantou

Recommend Brewing Style:

Gong Fu Style: 3-5g per 100ml, ~100C water, 30, 45, 60 then add 5-10 seconds steeps in gaiwan. Lasts 4-5+ steeps.

Western Style: 3g per 100ml, ~100c water for 3 minutes. Lasts 2-3 steeps.

About Mountain Stream Teas View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

85
1500 tasting notes

Drafting this note as I drink the tea. I drew from Leafhoppers and Lucky Me notes, and well, sense and instinct. I’ll add more as I drink it throughout the day, so expect some changes and edits.

Dryleaf is fruity and creamy, bordering on reminding me of sugarcane. First steep was a rinse, and it’s very sweet. Sweet corn, butter, honeydew (faint), sugar.

Second one after 25 seconds….flower water. Not much of anything.

Wet leaf smells like strawberries and cream. Third about 35 ish seconds in 4 ish oz, and more corn and whatever creamy floral. “Berries and cream,” osmanthus, melon of some form and something else. I’m feeling a little unoriginal, but I am liking this more than I thought I would. The vegetals might come soon, but so far, not so much. We’ll see as the session continues.

Now, 30-40ish seconds (maybe less), PEACH, orchids, osmanthus. Some green alpine-ness in the earlier part, barely vegetal. Very fresh and juicy.

Another round I did not count, probably close to less than a minute, and peach, but more floral. Orchid, herbs, osmanthus, and peachy finish.

47 seconds and heavy fruity aroma. Thick. Tasting it, thick fruit. Peach, jasmine, butter, and cantelope? More melon than peach personally. Immensely fruity.

And I think I’m ready for the waiting. Corn, peach, melon, cream, and florals are prominent for me. I felt very off for the florals though they are clearly present. I’ve been half tempted to write hyacinth for steep two, but I wasn’t sure. It could be the way I brewed it, but it was not as vegetal as the Fall A selection. This one was softer in comparison, though I didn’t expect it to be fruitier. I actually liked this one a little bit more despite it being more subdued. I also think it’s due to a little bit less leaves that I used, or I could be wrong. I’ll write a few things more soon, but I think I’ve gotten what I could out of the tea. Or have I?

Next steep. Vegetal spinach. Floral, but green, buttery, savory and herbaceous.

Flavors: Butter, Corn Husk, Floral, Fruity, Herbaceous, Herbs, Honeysuckle, Osmanthus, Peach, Sugarcane, Sweet

Leafhopper

I’m now wondering if I mislabelled these teas, though I don’t think I did. I have 35 g of this to get through, so I might try your longer steeping method or LuckyMe’s ambient brewing.

Daylon R Thomas

I was trying to think what the heck he meant by “ambient” lol. I’m fairly certain it’s the same tea. Like I said, this one was a little bit more subdued than A. I used the entirety of the sample in the instant though, and the only real difference I noticed in our brewing was the fact that I kept it short for a longer bit. I also might be ignoring the more herbaceous qualities for “Oh fruit!!!! I can taste fruit!”

Leafhopper

I assumed “ambient brewing” was bowl steeping the leaves in room-temperature water. The only thing I have that’s remotely like a tea bowl is my ~200 ml cup I use during gongfu sessions. My next smallest vessel is a 355 ml mug.

I usually glom on to the fruity notes as well, so it’s weird I didn’t get as many of them.

Daylon R Thomas

Corn is also kind of a vegetal note, too.

Leafhopper

That’s true, although I always interpret it as being sweeter than most veggies. Sometimes the corn I get in high mountain teas is like the really sweet cream corn nibblets from a can.

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75
321 tasting notes

In 2019, I bought a sample set of two fall Li Shan oolongs picked several days apart on the same farm. This is the one that was harvested later in the year. I steeped 6 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot at 195F for 25, 20, 25, 30, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds.

This tea has a stronger cookie aroma than the Li Shan A, along with citrus, cream, flowers, and spinach. The first steep has notes of cookies, butter, orchids, honeysuckle, other florals, cream, honey, faint citrus, grass, broccoli, and spinach. I get a strong mandarin orange note in the teapot, but steep two just offers more of the cookie and vegetal flavours. I get a strongly vegetal aftertaste. Orange and peach appear faintly in the aroma and taste of steeps three and four, but I really have to look for them. I also get more veggies and the high mountain herbaceousness I found in Li Shan A, along with a lovely apricot/peach aftertaste. The next couple steeps have a soft peach note that’s kind of overwhelmed by spinach, broccoli, kale, and grass. As in previous steeps, the aftertaste is the best part of this tea. The final steeps are a little floral but mostly vegetal, with broccoli, kale, spinach, and some astringency.

Judging from the very similar smell of the dry leaves, I was concerned that I wouldn’t be able to distinguish this tea from its earlier-harvested counterpart. I needn’t have worried, though, since most of the aroma didn’t make it into the cup. I might need to experiment with cold brewing like LuckyMe to pull out more of the fruity flavours.

Flavors: Apricot, Astringent, Broccoli, Butter, Citrus, Cookie, Cream, Floral, Grass, Herbaceous, Honey, Honeysuckle, Kale, Orange, Orchid, Peach, Spinach, Vegetal

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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86
593 tasting notes

Mountain Stream Teas offers 3 different grades of this Li Shan. All of them sourced from the same farm and processed the same, but on different days. The earlier the picking the better the tea is supposed to be. This is their “B” grade which was picked 6 days after the first harvest.

It has similar floral-fruity aromatics as Pear Mountain A with added notes of dried peaches and orchid. I would not recommend following Mountain Stream’s steeping instructions though as I ended up ruining my first cup. Not every tea takes well to boiling water. Anyway, the steeped tea is buttery and thick with mild floral undertones. It leans slightly savory and at time edges towards bitterness which goes away once the water temperature is lowered. Overall, it’s smooth and buttery though not very complex or nuanced.

Now the ambient brew was a totally different story and super delicious. Creamy and elegant, with jasmine like florals and a fruity note akin to strawberry. It had such a clean, effervescent quality to it like fresh water from a mountain spring. I wish I had the finesse to coax out this same flavor from hot steeping.

Flavors: Butter, Floral, Jasmine, Orchid, Peach, Strawberry

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 4 tsp 2 OZ / 68 ML

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