Pear Mountain Oolong (Fall Pick)

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apricot, Brown Sugar, Cream, Custard, Floral, Grass, Nutty, Orchid, Osmanthus, Vanilla, Almond, Apple, Cookie, Dandelion, Flowers, Gardenias, Mineral, Spinach, Sugarcane, Sweet, Sweet, warm grass, Vegetal, Violet
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 4 min, 30 sec 5 g 12 oz / 346 ml

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Maybe 25% oxidation is too low for me. I have tried many 고산차’s at this point, and most of them are just ho-hum to me given the expense. It’s easy to see why the category is appealing for many, but...” Read full tasting note
  • “And lastly, the fall pick. I find it to be the most enjoyable of the 4, although it’s not as delicate and complex than the snow pick. It has a stronger aroma than the spring pick, with a nutty,...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “Recently, I haven’t been paying as much attention to tasting as I’d like. The dry leaf is very fragrant with notes of vanilla, cream, florals and vegetal. Warmed was vegetal, lemon, sugarcane,...” Read full tasting note
    84
  • “I got the Four Seasons pack from Pear Mountain, and I am enjoying all of them. However, I am going to have to constantly rewrite notes as I crank them out and backlog, and likely talk about the...” Read full tasting note
    94

From Mountain Stream Teas

A favorite of this tea company, this Pear Mountain Oolong has all the markers of a world class tea. Clear beginnings to a sweet and sour stone fruit finish that lingers on the palate for hours. The classic butter mouthfeel of high mountain Taiwanese oolongs is enhanced by the beautiful flavors of this 2000m high terroir.

Elevation: 2000m

Status: Certified Organic

Cultivar: QinXin

Oxidization: 25%

Season: Fall 2017

Method: Hand picked, processed on site, very small batch

Region: Lishan(Pear Mountain), Nantou

Recommend Brewing Style:

Gong Fu Style: 3-5g per 100ml, ~100C water, 30, 45, 60 then add 5-10 seconds steeps in gaiwan. Lasts 4-5 steeps.

Western Style: 3g per 100ml, ~100c water for 3 minutes. Lasts 2-3 steeps.

About Mountain Stream Teas View company

Company description not available.

5 Tasting Notes

89 tasting notes

Maybe 25% oxidation is too low for me. I have tried many 고산차’s at this point, and most of them are just ho-hum to me given the expense. It’s easy to see why the category is appealing for many, but I seldom crave this sort of high mountain stuff. I don’t dislike it. It’s just not something I’m going to seek out.

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85
320 tasting notes

And lastly, the fall pick. I find it to be the most enjoyable of the 4, although it’s not as delicate and complex than the snow pick. It has a stronger aroma than the spring pick, with a nutty, floral and vanilla notes. There are a lot of florals in the smell, most notably osmanthus I think. The taste is strong from the very start of the session. It is quite multi-layered, delicate and mineral. The flavours include ones like custard, cream, grass, orchid, brown sugar and apricot pits. Mouthfeel is lubricating and body is medium I’d say.

Flavors: Apricot, Brown Sugar, Cream, Custard, Floral, Grass, Nutty, Orchid, Osmanthus, Vanilla

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 45 sec 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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84
462 tasting notes

Recently, I haven’t been paying as much attention to tasting as I’d like.

The dry leaf is very fragrant with notes of vanilla, cream, florals and vegetal. Warmed was vegetal, lemon, sugarcane, cream and floral. With the rinse, I could also pick up on some pine. Brewed gongfu in a clay teapot, I noticed how fragrant the tea was, just overall pleasant. I did not notice much change in flavors, with the dominant notes being florals, lemon, cream and a brown sugar sweetness with some vegetal on the swallow. And dang, what a swallow. The liquor was very smooth and thick with oil, only a little astringent.

Brewed western in a glass mason jar, it was even thicker, almost like the leaves were suspended in a thin gel matrix. However, brewed this way, the astringency became much more prominent. I also noticed the minerality of the tea more and some kind of stone fruit, maybe apricot? It’s not like the apricot of puer tea, though. On the second steep, there was a strong aftertaste of something like spaghetti squash. Not sure, but definitely squash in character.

Brewed grandpa in a thermos, both the oiliness and astringency really stuck around. My tongue was slick for a few hours with no food. Here the brown sugar and spice notes that Daylon R Thomas talked about were very prominent. I could see Cinnamon Toast Crunch. I think I liked it best brewed grandpa because of that quality.

I don’t think this is my favorite of the four Lishan I’ve tried in the past few months, but it is worth picking up a larger quantity and having better attention paid to it. I’d also like to try brewing it at a temperature lower than the recommended 100C to see if that will tame the astringency.

Daylon R Thomas

I have not read your notes on the others, but what did you think of them?

derk

I wasn’t sure when I first purchased from MST if I’d like Lishan so I bought just this one. Did your sampler contain Fall and Winter 2017 and Spring 2018?

Daylon R Thomas

Yep, and the snow pick.

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94
1124 tasting notes

I got the Four Seasons pack from Pear Mountain, and I am enjoying all of them. However, I am going to have to constantly rewrite notes as I crank them out and backlog, and likely talk about the samples in unison.

I tried this tea out first and foremost as I gong fu brewed it. The first 20 sec steep was milky and sweet like spices and brown sugar amidst a faintly green background, and the second 15 steep was like milk soaked in cinnamon toast crunch, hitting a high sugary note that enveloped the back of my throat, and then my sinuses. The cinnamon and brown sugar notes kept going steeps 3-5, but then faded out into osmanthus ever so gradually. I got some slight stonefruit notes that I’ll have to pick a part when I drink it again, but the sugary notes and the spice accents were the most prominent.

That said, it was vegetal, but more viscous than herbacious. The vegetal notes were otherwise very faint and light like coriander since the texture dominated the steeps with the sweeter flavors. The greener notes showed up in the later steeps, developing a more citrus like edge into steep ten. It’s a tie between this tea and the snow pick so far, but I will say this is a very good Li Shan at a great price for $25 for 100 grams. I’d be interested to see how my next visit with this gem changes. I noticed a difference in the vessels for drinking the snow pick, so I’m curious what it has to offer.

derk

Since you picked up on osmanthus, I’m going to have to try an osmanthus oolong I bought before getting into my 10g pouch of this tea.

Daylon R Thomas

It was in the very last few steeps.

Togo

Nice! I just ordered the pack as well, so it’s good to hear these are tasty :)

Daylon R Thomas

Yeah, I could not resist it. $32 for a Li Shan sampler is awesome!

LuckyMe

I heard about them on IG and have a handful of samples on their way to me. I got the spring version of this tea. How do this compare to Tillerman’s Li Shan?

Daylon R Thomas

Tillerman’s Lishan has more staying power and fruit notes, so it does exceed this tea, but this one is a little closer to the Cuifeng in terms of its spicy notes. I got more flavor in the roof my mouth for this one, and more flavor on the tip of my tongue for the Cuifeng. Cuifeng also was more alpine and conifer like, whereas this was straight up levels of sweetness. I’m not sure if I have a particular preference in terms of the taste because they both had the notes that I love in Lishan, but with their own character.

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