Huang Guan Yin Jinjunmei

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Bread, Butter, Cocoa, Earth, Floral, Hay, Herbaceous, Honey, Lavender, Lemon, Malt, Mineral, Orchid, Rose, Rye, Sweet, Sweet Potatoes, Tannin, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Leafhopper
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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  • “After enjoying a gongfu session with Wuyi Origin’s Meizhan Jin Jun Mei a few days ago, I thought I’d do an impromptu comparison with another JJM I had lying around. Following the vendor’s...” Read full tasting note
    87

From Sipscollection

Jinjunmei (金骏眉) is a famous type of black tea produced in Wuyishan, Fujian Province. It is characterised by its eyebrow-shaped golden buds and its malty flavour and aroma. Jinjunmei is actually a very new tea, with its production only starting in 2005, yet it has rose to esteemed fame in the short amount of time that it has existed. Sipscollection is proud to offer an excellent Jinjunmei tea that comes with an interesting twist.

Instead of being produced using the typical small-leaf 小种 cultivars found in Wuyishan, this tea is produced using the Huang Guan Yin (黄观音) cultivar, a varietal typically reserved for oolong teas. Boasting a slightly sweet and floral profile, this tea has a unique taste unlike most Jinjunmei teas out there. Considering the buds of this tea are silver and not golden, you may find it difficult to call this tea a “Jinjunmei”. However, it still retains a Jinjunmei character with a lighter and more delicate twist. Try this tea out today!

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1 Tasting Note

87
429 tasting notes

After enjoying a gongfu session with Wuyi Origin’s Meizhan Jin Jun Mei a few days ago, I thought I’d do an impromptu comparison with another JJM I had lying around. Following the vendor’s instructions, I steeped 6 g of leaf in 120 ml of 195F water for 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 200, and 240 seconds, plus some long, uncounted steeps.

True to the description, this tea has lots of fuzzy, silvery little buds mixed with the dark leaf. The dry aroma is of rye bread, cocoa, honey, florals, and malt. The first steep has notes of rye bread, honey, butter, orchid, lemon cake, herbs, malt, and sweet potato. Steep two adds a hint of cocoa, more sweet potato, rose, and some dryness in the mouth. The next couple steeps feature more malt and sweet potato, plus lavender, florals, lemon, minerals, and light tannins. Steeps five and six are very similar, with a little more bread and honey but with plenty of florals. The final few steeps have notes of malt, bread, honey, florals, earth, minerals, hay, and wood, with a nice honey aftertaste.

As someone who is fond of floral teas, I’m not surprised that I enjoyed this Jin Jun Mei. The long steep times were a bit unusual for me, but they produced strong, complex flavours and surprisingly little bitterness. I’m not sure I could detect that it was made from Huang Guan Yin material without having been told, though the florality does seem similar in my limited experience. I liked this more than the Meizhan JJM from Wuyi Origin, but the rose and other florals had a lot to do with that. I think these are both high-quality teas.

Flavors: Bread, Butter, Cocoa, Earth, Floral, Hay, Herbaceous, Honey, Lavender, Lemon, Malt, Mineral, Orchid, Rose, Rye, Sweet, Sweet Potatoes, Tannin, Wood

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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