Huang Shan Bao Zhong Organic

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Butter, Cream, Custard, Floral, Gardenias, Grass, Green Apple, Honeydew, Honeysuckle, Lettuce, Mineral, Pear, Spinach, Sugarcane, Vanilla, Violet, Wood, Cinnamon, Vegetal
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Ubacat
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Sometimes I buy a tea just because I think there is something up with the way it is marketed. When I saw this tea on Tealyra’s website, I was immediately confused and intrigued. Huang Shan is...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “Imagine that toads were related to clams and also had pearls that were within them. This tea tasted like a toad that fell into a volcano and its pearl shot into the air and got stuck in a cloud and...” Read full tasting note

From Tealyra

Made in small artisanal batches, Huang Shan Bao Zhong is a certified organic team of the highest grade in its category. Bao Zhong is processed with minimal handling, from the hand picking to the rolling to the drying; these leaves are touched as little as possible to ensure the freshest, greenest taste possible. This process allows the leaves to keep their lush deep jade color, which translates into the liquid when this tea is brewed.

Incredible freshness is the first taste that the tea drinker experiences as the cool liquid rolls into the mouth. This freshness is followed by a light butteriness and a long complex sweet undertone and finishes with cool round exotic silky mouth feel. The complex personality of flavors makes this a tea that is appreciated by experienced and non experienced tea drinkers alike. The tea leaves hold up extremely well in multiple infusions, making this artesian tea a favorite for tea enthusiasts.

About Tealyra View company

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2 Tasting Notes

83
837 tasting notes

Sometimes I buy a tea just because I think there is something up with the way it is marketed. When I saw this tea on Tealyra’s website, I was immediately confused and intrigued. Huang Shan is located in China’s Anhui Province, but this oolong was marketed as being produced in Taiwan. I figured I was either missing something or that something did not quite add up, so I bought the tea and set about doing a little research. It turns out that there is an area in Taitung County, Taiwan popularly referred to as “Little Huang Shan,” or more properly as Xiao Huang Shan, just outside of Beinan Township. Further exploration revealed the presence of the Jia Fang Tea Plantation nearby. Apparently, it is pretty popular with tourists to the area and is mostly known for a lightly oxidized strip style oolong similar to the more familiar Wenshan Baozhong. If you search for images of Jia Fang products, you will most likely immediately stumble upon the same image I found-a very green loose leaf oolong packaged in a green box with a cartoonish smiling person on the side. I would be surprised if this were not the same tea.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a very quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 195 F water for 7 seconds. This infusion was chased by 12 subsequent infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 10 seconds, 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, and 3 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves offered gentle aromas of cream, custard, honeysuckle, and hyacinth. After the rinse, I found new aromas of gardenia, butter, vanilla, violet, and lilac. The first proper infusion offered slightly stronger butter and cream aromas coupled with an emerging sugarcane presence. In the mouth, I found barely perceptible notes of wood and grass which quickly gave way to cream, butter, vanilla, and floral notes. Subsequent infusions brought out the grass and wood on the nose. I also began to pick up stronger floral flavors and emerging magnolia, pear, green apple, mineral, spinach, leaf lettuce, and honeydew impressions. Notes of sugarcane also showed up on the palate. The later infusions were heavy on mineral notes, though I could also detect touches of grass, spinach, cream, and butter, sometimes with distant background notes of green apple and flowers.

This was a very light, delicate oolong with a nice mix of savory, vegetal, floral, and fruity characteristics in the mouth. It did a reasonably good job of approximating the character of a traditional Wenshan Baozhong, though it was missing a little of the depth I tend to get from really good examples of that type of tea. Fans of lighter, greener oolongs would undoubtedly be satisfied with this tea, especially considering that the cost is more than reasonable. All in all, this was a very solid, enjoyable drinking experience. I doubt I would turn to this over a respectable Wenshan Baozhong, but it was a nice tea nonetheless.

Flavors: Butter, Cream, Custard, Floral, Gardenias, Grass, Green Apple, Honeydew, Honeysuckle, Lettuce, Mineral, Pear, Spinach, Sugarcane, Vanilla, Violet, Wood

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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1112 tasting notes

Imagine that toads were related to clams and also had pearls that were within them. This tea tasted like a toad that fell into a volcano and its pearl shot into the air and got stuck in a cloud and dried out over two weeks. Once it fell down it transformed into an oolong and Tealyra had no idea what it really was so they decided to sell it as organic tea…

Nicole

That is an interesting review…

Thomas Edward(Toad)

alrighty then, lol, thats great!
Sounds tasty to me

Haveteawilltravel

I’m not sure I want to put that in my mouth…

Dr Jim

So, does it taste more like a toad, or hot lava?

Liquid Proust

It taste like a roasted gem that is somewhat alive as a clam’s taste would be… so with that being said, it has minor notes of vegetable that are actually tasted as a roasted green oolong (which is a roasted oolong…). However, while being roasted, it is a liquid so that is where the whole cloud thing comes into play.

I just write what I think, I suppose my brain at the time of this review was kind of giddy :)

gmathis

Thanks for the laugh. Needed that this morning!

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