2008 Qianjiazhai Wild (Malaysia Stored)

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Sugarcane, Sweet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by The Essence of Tea
Average preparation
Boiling 6 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “When I got this sample it had sourish notes of a tea that had gotten too dry or was sealed in a sample bag too long so I did my usual trick of wrapping it in paper and placing it in a humidified...” Read full tasting note
  • “Smokey in the first two steeps but it quickly faded. After that it’s unfading, gentle sweetness that lasts steep after steep. The mouth feel really embodies what it means for a tea to be “sticky.”...” Read full tasting note
    85

From The Essence of Tea

We’re fans of wild ancient tree tea. Even better when it’s aged.

These cakes were pressed by a Malaysian tea merchant from the old wild trees in Qianjiazhai. The wild tea trees in this area are huge – the oldest estimated to be 2700 years old, but with many more in the forest that are estimated to be many hundreds or over a thousand years old. The environment is still very pure & has been protected by the government.

We’re very happy to offer this cake. At first the person who pressed it didn’t want to sell us these cakes – he was worried about them being sold online since he also has some customers selling at higher prices. As a compromise, we’ve removed the wrapper and neifei & will rewrap with plain wrapper. Branding aside, the tea itself is very good quality and the price is good. The tea has changed nicely. The wild leaves have a very strong energy and sweet, fruity taste. It’s not often we come across aged wild teas of this quality.

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2 Tasting Notes

75 tasting notes

When I got this sample it had sourish notes of a tea that had gotten too dry or was sealed in a sample bag too long so I did my usual trick of wrapping it in paper and placing it in a humidified canister with other samples in similar condition. After a few months I’d forgotten about this tea and reread the description on the eot site and remembered that I had some. First 2 steeps were smoky and sweet. Oddly I’m reminded of Korean bbq pork with perhaps a touch of pineapple and cardamom. Steeps 4-5 are among the thickest stickiest shots of tea I’ve had in recent history and have a thick brown sugar caramel taste that reminds me of a Belgian strong ale. Steep 6 sees an enormous drop in thickness and the emergence of the tart and snappy but thin tastes of semi aged Wuliang yesheng like that of YS. At this point the qi hits and is of the relaxing clarifying type. At this point I keep doing long steeps expecting the kill steep is near but I’m rewarded with a slight return to thickness and continual shape shifting flavors. Excellent yesheng.

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85
27 tasting notes

Smokey in the first two steeps but it quickly faded. After that it’s unfading, gentle sweetness that lasts steep after steep. The mouth feel really embodies what it means for a tea to be “sticky.” When I drink it, I have the mouth feel of kinda of chewing on a sticky boba (from milk tea). The sweetness is not like honey or stone fruits but more like sugarcane and sticky rice.

I like this tea.

Flavors: Sugarcane, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 6 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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