Fenghuang Dan Cong 2007 LIMITED EDITION

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by AnnaEA
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 10 g 12 oz / 354 ml

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I’m not a huge Dancong fan. When it comes to oolongs, I tend to prefer the more caramelly roasty Wuyi oolong-types. Also, with most dancongs, I tend to prefer the aroma of the tea more than the...” Read full tasting note
  • “I have LOADS of this tea in my cupboard and still trying to find the perfect brewing for it (I’m getting closer). I know bamboo charcoal will change the PH of the water and bring out the honey...” Read full tasting note
  • “I pulled this one out today because it will bring me down to 100 teas lol thus meeting my goal for the month. I’ve got no clue how i’ll manage April’s goal but we can pretend that it’ll happen....” Read full tasting note
  • “1/24/2015 10g/12oz/212F/15sec This is a lovely tea, generously shared with me by gschuschke. I’m still figuring out the best brewing params for it, because the tea I am getting in the...” Read full tasting note
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From The Finest Brew

Dan cong, although scarcely, are also aged much like Pu’er tea to further enhance and explore the full depths of its taste and aroma. This 2007 Dan cong has astonishing flavor profiles with prominent notes of peach and a hint of mango, with an uplifting fragrance that resembles the smell in the air at a beautifully grown peach farm. The rich liquor bursts full of life, making this a terrific way to enjoy an oolong that is considered the tea equivalent of Champagne.

Grown in Feng Huang Shan, or otherwise known as the Phoenix Mountains in Guangdong Province, this oolong tea is made using fresh leaves picked during late spring. Dan cong, meaning ‘single trunk’, is named after the tea tree this highly sought-after tea grows on in contrast to most tea bushes that emerge from the ground as a cluster of branches. Lightly pan-roasted on a charcoal-fired stove, Dan cong tea are known for their ability to naturally imitate the flavors and fragrances of various fruits and flowers.

Received in its freshest form at The Finest Brew Beijing office; the leaves are once again thoroughly examined as part of rigorous quality control before packing with great care. It is then couriered to our warehouse in South San Francisco to make its way to you as quickly as possible.


Origin : Phoenix Mountain, Guangdong Province
Production Date : 2007

How to brew Fenghuang Dan Cong 2007 LIMITED EDITION

Use : 6-8g of tea per 90ml of water
Temperature : Steep at 90ºC/194ºF (DO NOT USE BOILING WATER)
Brew : 10 times
Rinse
First Brew : 15 seconds
Subsequent brews : 10s,10s,15s,105s,20s….

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5 Tasting Notes

3294 tasting notes

I’m not a huge Dancong fan. When it comes to oolongs, I tend to prefer the more caramelly roasty Wuyi oolong-types. Also, with most dancongs, I tend to prefer the aroma of the tea more than the actual tea.

I know, that’s terrible, right? This one is the same. It’s probably my fault, because although I try to keep the steepings short, sometimes I forget to count, or whatever, and then I end up with bitter swill, and it only takes a few seconds for that to happen.

So, the aroma of this one is sweet & peachy, actually quite lovely. The first cup was also very nice, with a light fruit liquor. The 2nd cup still smelled wonderful, but I accidentally gave it 15 seconds, instead of 10, and there was a sharp bitterness at the end of each sip. For the 3rd steep I tried to back the time up to 10 seconds again, but unfortunately the damage was done and the bitterness remained.

Oh well…

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661 tasting notes

I have LOADS of this tea in my cupboard and still trying to find the perfect brewing for it (I’m getting closer).

I know bamboo charcoal will change the PH of the water and bring out the honey notes in this tea. I bought some bamboo charcoal from Yunnan Sourcing just for that but haven’t tried it yet. I’ve been currently using a Brita filter because Hubby changed the filters for our kitchen tap and the water tasted worse than before! After much tracking down of what was affecting all my teas it turns out he had used a filter that ADDED a taste to water. I asked him why on earth would you want to add a taste to water??? It’s supposed to be tasteless. Well, he promised to change it and I know what that meant: could be weeks or months. So I got out a Brita filter and started filtering my water.

I was thinking today of this tea today and thought I would give it a try with the water from the Brita filter. It’s charcoal so wouldn’t the Dan Cong taste better? Well, it actually did! I brewed it gongfu and the first infusion was a bit honey and floral. After that it just settled for a plain roasted taste that never changed for each infusion. This website says to filter with a Brita filter AND boil the water with bamboo charcoal. I think I will give that try. AT least this tea is not spoiling by sitting in my cabinet so long. It’s just supposed to get better with age.

yyz

Curious about your water experiment. I also find that this Tea is loads better when steeped chazhou style gongfu( Loads of leaf and flash steeping). That made a huge difference for me.

Teatotaler

I wouldn’t even dream of making tea without my trusty Brita filtered water pitcher! Like the old TV commercial says: Brita’s better! :)

Ubacat

YYZ, yes, brewing this gongfu is the only way to go but it requires even more adjustments. Next time I will try this:

http://tea-obsession.blogspot.ca/2008/01/how-to-brew-dan-cong.html

Taatotaler, I have a filter on my kitchen tap and it’s always been enough if the right filters are installed.

Ubacat

I meant Teatotaler not Taatotaler.

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10202 tasting notes

I pulled this one out today because it will bring me down to 100 teas lol thus meeting my goal for the month. I’ve got no clue how i’ll manage April’s goal but we can pretend that it’ll happen. HA! This is a very “green” tea with oolongy notes. there’s sweetness to it though, that i DO like even if the tea as a whole isn’t my favourite. It’s not a bad little tea, i just wouldn’t want it all the time given MY preferences :) For those who enjoy a good dancong, i’d give this one a try :)

Stephanie

did someone say DANCONG? :D

Sil

hahaha

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114 tasting notes

1/24/2015 10g/12oz/212F/15sec This is a lovely tea, generously shared with me by gschuschke. I’m still figuring out the best brewing params for it, because the tea I am getting in the cup just doesn’t feel like the best tea that is in this leaf. It’s a Dan Cong and me thing – I just can’t seem to coax out their best features.

Happily with this gift, I have enough leaf to experiment with a variety of brewing techniques.

This cup is a lovely light gold, with a creamy vegetal/honey aroma and taste. Like fresh picked spring peas pureed with a bit of cream and drop of honey.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 10 g 12 OZ / 354 ML
The Finest Brew Co.

Hi Anna, am I correct in assuming you tried brewing it gong-fu with a Yixing pot or a gaiwan?

AnnaEA

I’m having it gonfu today! I pulled out my little clay pot, and leafed it 1g per 10ml (so 8g – almost didn’t fit in the pot!). I’ll write a tasting note for today’s gongfu later. later. The above brew was in my small Chinese porcelain tea pot. I was able to brew three pots that tasted well – the fourth was a bit watery, so I left it at that.

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