Wu Yi Shan "Cheng Gao Cong" Old Bush Shui Xian Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Brown Toast, Cannabis, Char, Cherry, Cinnamon, Cranberry, Cream, Dark Wood, Ginger, Grass, Green Beans, Lemon, Mineral, Mushrooms, Nutmeg, Peanut, Popcorn, Raisins, Smoke, Spinach, Sugar, Tobacco, Roasted
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

5 Own it Own it

4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Well, I finally have summer classes out of the way. Finals week ended yesterday, and I should be looking at straight A’s for the term. I would be more proud myself, but this is like the fourth time...” Read full tasting note
    81
  • “I also got a somewhat over roasted note, though that might it a good to keep for a year or two to see what happens. Nose; slight smoke, dried fruits, lightly sweet and mineral character, leaf is...” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “7.5g, 90mL zisha Imagine your morning toast is a bit too well-done but not quite burnt. That’s what this tea was like. deep roasted but not burnt or smokey, no bitterness, very clean and smooth,...” Read full tasting note
  • “Had this one gong fu this morning. I’m just not a fan of dark roasted oolongs. There are very few that I really like. This one was no exception since all I could get with it was a roasted...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

Cheng Gao Cong refers to Shui Xian grown in the Wu Yi Shan Scenic Area from bushes aged 30 to 60 years old.

Our “Cheng Gao Cong” Shui Xian is a medium roasted style. The roasting is done in serveral stages and combines low temperature roasting and withering. The result is complex textured tea soup that is thick and inviting to drink. The brewed tea has a thick fruity mineral sweetness and soft mellow after-taste that reminds us of an aged Wu Yi rock tea. With a few years of age this tea’s roasted taste will mellow and it will develop a whole new range of tastes and aromas!

An excellent example of traditionally processed old bush Shui Xian.

May 2015 harvest

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

4 Tasting Notes

81
853 tasting notes

Well, I finally have summer classes out of the way. Finals week ended yesterday, and I should be looking at straight A’s for the term. I would be more proud myself, but this is like the fourth time I have found myself back in school, so it stands to reason that I should have the whole school thing down by now. Probably the best thing for me now is that I finally have time to start getting some more tea reviews posted. This was one of my more recent sipdowns. I think I finished it around the end of last week. My only prior experience with Yunnan Sourcing Shui Xian was borderline terrible, so I did not expect much from this tea. Fortunately for me, this turned out to be very nice. It was not the best Wuyi Shui Xian I have had, but I certainly enjoyed it.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 205 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was chased by 16 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of cinnamon, ginger, raisin, and dark wood. After the rinse, I noted new aromas of roasted almond, roasted peanut, smoke, and bizarrely enough, dried cranberry. The first infusion then brought out hints of rock sugar on the nose. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of cinnamon, raisin, ginger, roasted almond, roasted peanut, rock sugar, and smoke backed by subtle impressions of brown toast and grass. Subsequent infusions saw char, roasted green beans, mushroom, and cannabis appear on the nose, while new impressions of roasted green beans, char, cannabis, mushroom, tobacco, cooked spinach, cream, lemon, and tart cherry appeared in the mouth. Dried cranberry and dark wood notes also emerged in the mouth around this time, and I was just able to catch some faint hints of nutmeg in the background. The final infusions presented lingering notes of minerals, cream, raisin, and dark wood balanced by fleeting roasted nut and lemon accents and a belatedly emerging popcorn impression.

A surprisingly pleasant Wuyi Shui Xian, I would definitely be willing to purchase a more recent version of this tea if one were to ever be stocked. I particularly appreciated the nice balance of nutty, woody, fruity, and vegetal components, and this tea certainly displayed a satisfying longevity and nice texture in the mouth. Overall, I have no major complaints with this tea. The only real knock I can throw out here is that I have had other teas of this type that I have enjoyed somewhat more.

Flavors: Almond, Brown Toast, Cannabis, Char, Cherry, Cinnamon, Cranberry, Cream, Dark Wood, Ginger, Grass, Green Beans, Lemon, Mineral, Mushrooms, Nutmeg, Peanut, Popcorn, Raisins, Smoke, Spinach, Sugar, Tobacco

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

80
91 tasting notes

I also got a somewhat over roasted note, though that might it a good to keep for a year or two to see what happens. Nose; slight smoke, dried fruits, lightly sweet and mineral character, leaf is smaller too and darker. Palate; as nose, slight vegetal note, very light floral note.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 15 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

56 tasting notes

7.5g, 90mL zisha

Imagine your morning toast is a bit too well-done but not quite burnt. That’s what this tea was like. deep roasted but not burnt or smokey, no bitterness, very clean and smooth, no aftertaste, a very clean feeling left in the mouth.

This tea put me to sleep too, and I drank it just after breakfast…whelp…back to bed for a bit!

If you like the heavy roasted wuyi’s this may be worth getting a sample of, if you like the fruitier/sweeter then this may not be your cup of tea.

Flavors: Roasted

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

661 tasting notes

Had this one gong fu this morning. I’m just not a fan of dark roasted oolongs. There are very few that I really like. This one was no exception since all I could get with it was a roasted taste. I probably would have gotten more if I did more infusions ( I only did two.); but I just didn’t want anymore. I’ll maybe try it at another time when I feel I can go with more infusions.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.