2016 Yunnan Sourcing "Autumn Da Qing Gu Shu" Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apricot, Astringent, Berry, Drying, Hops, Hot hay, Lemongrass, Pleasantly Sour, Taro Root, Tobacco, Alcohol, Black Pepper, Butter, Forest Floor, Grass, Marine, Mint, Pine, Salty, Sour, Umami, Wood
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I haven’t had a session with this tea in a while and I decided to revisit it to check on its progression. Let me add some more observations I had during today’s cupping. The aroma of the wet leaf...” Read full tasting note
    91

From Yunnan Sourcing

Da Qing Gu Shu (Da Qing Old Tree) is made from old tree tea leaves picked at the end of Autumn. Da Qing village is located in Jinggu county and is a remote village with unadulterated tea trees growing in the nearby hillsides. The leaves for this production are from one family whose trees are the oldest in the area. The age of the trees between 100-300 years old.

The tea is perfectly balanced and is very stable through many infusions. Bitterness, astingency, sweet, spicy and floral all at once with long lasting taste and feeling in the mouth, throat and body long after drinking it.

Very limited quantity one family production!

400 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo leaf tong)

40kg in total produced

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

91
355 tasting notes

I haven’t had a session with this tea in a while and I decided to revisit it to check on its progression. Let me add some more observations I had during today’s cupping.

The aroma of the wet leaf is somewhat marine like and woody. The liquor is mouth-watering and oily. In this session, the taste of the early infusions seems to have more of vegetal and umami flavours, verging on salty at times. I get some grass and alcohol notes too. Middle infusions see the rise of woody and pine flavours. Late infusions are still slightly vegetal, but not really that much savoury anymore. They display more sweetness to complement the sourness that persists. Flavours like taro, butter and mint emerge. Aftertaste is very long and evolves in various directions. At certain points it gets kind of sweet only to give way to the original sour/umami flavours of the liquor returning in brief bursts. After about 10 minutes, the aftertaste displays also some spices, most prominently black pepper I’d say. Cha qi is strong, especially if you let yourself get lost in it, because it is not so overwhelming by itself, like I also mentioned in my first review.

Flavors: Alcohol, Black Pepper, Butter, Drying, Forest Floor, Grass, Marine, Mint, Pine, Salty, Sour, Taro Root, Tobacco, Umami, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
tanluwils

Would you prefer it to the 2016 DQ spring harvest?

Togo

I am not sure, I haven’t sampled any of the other DQ teas. It’s interesting that there is such a small price difference, I should probably get a spring sample for comparison at some point.

tanluwils

I’m a fan of the spring 2016 and 2015 DQ, which are quite different. The 2016 spring pressing has so much going on that it’s hard to find a fault, unless one doesn’t like strong young sheng…

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