Ta Ku Hou Village High Mountain Dan Cong * Spring 2018

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Cacao, Camphor, Chicory, Eucalyptus, Grapes, Plum, Almond, Apple, Cherry, Coriander, Cream, Grass, Herbaceous, Honey, Honeydew, Lychee, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange Blossom, Orange Zest, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Stonefruit, Sugarcane, Tangerine, Vanilla, Violet, Wood
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 4 oz / 119 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I brewed this gong fu as I do with most teas. For an old arbor high mountain oolong – the tea’s aroma was surprisingly subtle with notes of a mild tasting grape. When washed – the leaves took on a...” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “Normally, I go either walking or jogging around this time, but it’s raining here, so I’m posting some more tea reviews instead. I’m exhausted anyway. I’ve had three straight very long, very hectic...” Read full tasting note
    92

From Yunnan Sourcing

Ta Ku Hou village is a small village near Phoenix town just to the west at an altitude of 1350 meters. This is one of highest altitude villages in the Wu Dong mountainous area. Our Ta Ku Hou Dan Cong is grown by one family and is from a small crop harvested from their own small tea garden. The trees are between 60 and 120 years old and grow wild without intervention.

The tea itself is medium leaf, dry leaf is dark in color and when brewed is typically green with some brown. The tea has been hand-picked and processed at each stage, and took more than a month of labor to complete. The taste is very vibrant and complex with notes of fruit and eucalyptus. There is a slight bitter which accentuates the fruity sweetness this tea delivers. It’s got a strong mouth-feel, cha qi and is very infusable.

A premium small-batch Dan Cong that imparts the depth and wisdom of this incredible tradition to those fortunate enough to try it.

3.6 kilograms in total!

May 2018 harvest and processing

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

75
19 tasting notes

I brewed this gong fu as I do with most teas. For an old arbor high mountain oolong – the tea’s aroma was surprisingly subtle with notes of a mild tasting grape. When washed – the leaves took on a strong root smell akin to chicory with the mildness of maca.
While the aroma was dominated by a rooty smell – it wasn’t overpowering in the flavor of the liquor itself which had nice dark fruit notes (perhaps a ripe yet bland plum?) and cacao flavors. The aftertaste was very camphor heavy – perhaps almost eucalyptus; this only came out after the first steep however.
This tea was very nice and complex, but not worth the 1.26/g I paid for it.

Flavors: Cacao, Camphor, Chicory, Eucalyptus, Grapes, Plum

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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92
1031 tasting notes

Normally, I go either walking or jogging around this time, but it’s raining here, so I’m posting some more tea reviews instead. I’m exhausted anyway. I’ve had three straight very long, very hectic days at work, and fitting in job interviews, regular errands, and the like has been an utter nightmare. Anyway, this was another of my Dancong oolong sipdowns from late 2020/early 2021. I loved the spring 2017 Ta Ku Village High Mountain Dan Cong, and I ended up loving this spring 2018 version too.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a 10 second rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 fluid ounces of 203 F water for 7 seconds. This initial infusion was followed by 16 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves presented aromas of honey, peach, tangerine, lychee, cherry, sugarcane, and vanilla. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of roasted almond and cream. The first infusion added aromas of orchid and orange blossom. In the mouth, the tea liquor offered up notes of honey, tangerine, peach, orchid, lychee, roasted almond, and orange blossom that were balanced by hints of cherry, sugarcane, cream, grass, and vanilla. The bulk of the subsequent infusions introduced aromas of pear, violet, plum, grass, caraway, and honeydew. Stronger and more immediately detectable notes of grass, sugarcane, cherry, cream, and vanilla appeared in the mouth alongside notes of minerals, caraway, pear, violet, apple, plum, nectarine, orange zest, and honeydew. I also found hints of eucalyptus, wood, nutmeg, wintergreen, and coriander. As the tea faded, the liquor emphasized notes of minerals, tangerine, cream, violet, apple, pear, and lychee alongside an amplified woodiness. These impressions were backed by lingering hints of orchid, roasted almond, sugarcane, honey, orange zest, grass, coriander, plum, and wintergreen.

This tea displayed a very unique and quirky overall profile. It was definitely among the most interesting of the spring 2018 Dancong oolongs that I tried. It also was very well put together. Nothing was out of place. I don’t know who is producing the Ta Ku Hou Village Dancong that Yunnan Sourcing stocks each spring, but in my opinion, they are doing a consistently excellent job. This was a tea worth checking out.

Flavors: Almond, Apple, Cherry, Coriander, Cream, Eucalyptus, Grass, Herbaceous, Honey, Honeydew, Lychee, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange Blossom, Orange Zest, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Plum, Stonefruit, Sugarcane, Tangerine, Vanilla, Violet, Wood

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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