2021 Yunnan Sourcing "Meng Zhu Da Shan" Old Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Gardenias, Grass, Jasmine, Mint, Moss
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Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
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  • “I haven’t posted in over 2 years, so forgive me if I’m behind the times on my tea lingo. I purchased this as a sample from Scott’s 2021 lineup. I drank this one gongfu style, per usual, but also...” Read full tasting note
    81

From Yunnan Sourcing

Meng Zhu Da Shan 勐主大山 is a mountainous area in the far northwest part of Jinggu near the border of Bang Dong county (Lincang) and Jinggu county (Simao). This area is remote and the altitude of this wild tea garden is about 1800 meters above sea level. The tea trees range in age from 100-200 years old and grow naturally. They are not tended much at all other than a thrice yearly path cleared by scythes to get to the area.

Meng Zhu Da Shan has a unique character that has some both sweetness and bitterness, sharing character with both Jinggu and Bang Dong teas.

Stone-pressed in the traditional manner.

Wrapper design by Genevieve Busby

Pressed on June 16th 2021

250 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo tong)

40 kilograms in total

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

81
144 tasting notes

I haven’t posted in over 2 years, so forgive me if I’m behind the times on my tea lingo. I purchased this as a sample from Scott’s 2021 lineup. I drank this one gongfu style, per usual, but also blind since I’m unfamiliar with the tea’s region and couldn’t remember description or the price/g.

It’s an interesting tea. It lacks that generic sheng aroma of apricots which I do like but will trade for uniquness.

This tea reminded me more of Scott’s Wuliang pressings in many aspects. The dried tea leaves were smaller than usual. The processing needs some work, as many of the leaves looked broken in my tea chunk, which also has happened before with mainly Wuliang teas. When brewed, the aroma had an orchid-like character that placed this somewhere between Wuliang and Bangdong teas.

In fact, the only thing that links this tea with Jinggu is that the flavor strongly resembles Da Mao Shan teas Scott had pressed in 2017, which are also quite different from other Jinggu teas.

There are sharp floral notes and a good amount of grassiness. I’m a sencha guy and generally like greener shengs, so this combination is just fine. There is good depth and some earthiness in the background. The tea is very present in the back of the mouth and throat, and there’s good cha qi. My wife commented on the aroma being soft. I would agree. I’m enjoying the long sweet floral and minty finish…there’s a hint of jasmine in there.

It’s worth a try for sure, especially since I don’t see Scott pressing any Wuliang teas this year.

Flavors: Gardenias, Grass, Jasmine, Mint, Moss

ashmanra

Welcome back!

tea-sipper

Yeah, welcome back!

tanluwils

Thank you! I forgot how much I enjoyed posting my thoughts here. I haven’t had to quarantine myself knock on wood but I think leaving tasting notes/sharing tea experiences isn’t a bad way to spend time locked indoors.

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