2005 Aged Tie Guan Yin

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Joshua Smith
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 15 sec

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I ran across this tea in my stash when I was looking for my Shu puerh, and realized I hadn't had this for months. The first thing that struck me when I opened the tin was the strong roasted smell...” Read full tasting note
    88
    smitty1110 242 tasting notes

From China Cha Dao

Tie Guan Yin is considered part of the Oolong tea family as a semi-fermented tea. Ti Kuan Yin is known as a special variety of Camellia Sinesis (tea plant). Ti Kuan Yin from Taiwan is a very close relative of Dark Oolong tea because it is baked longer than Green Oolong. China Ti Kuan Yin such as Anxi Ti Kuan Yin is very similar to Green Oolongs. Due to sometimes a dark appearance of the dry leaves and a ancient story, Ti Kuan Yin is named after the Iron Goddess of Mercy.

The tea is roasted twice a year with high temp, this is why the tea can be aged.

Aged Tie Guan Yin is much more mellow compare to the fresh ones, the taste will be very similar to oolong tea like Da Hong Pao.

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5 Tasting Notes

88
242 tasting notes

I ran across this tea in my stash when I was looking for my Shu puerh, and realized I hadn’t had this for months. The first thing that struck me when I opened the tin was the strong roasted smell of the leaves. I put some in my tea ball, and let it steep in nearly-boiling water for three minutes. The result is a fairly dark tea that smells very roasted/toasty. The taste is very much like a Wuyi Oolong, much more so that I actually remember. The taste is pretty much the standard heavily-roasted Oolong taste, with no tea distinguishing feature, but the aftertaste tastes mineral-ish, but it doesn’t have the same smooth feeling associated with Wuyi Oolongs. Overall, it was a very pleasant tea, but with nothing special as of yet. I don’t have high expectations, but I’ll see how it develops in later steeps.

Second infusion, 205 degree water for a minute and a half. The tea is a nice caramel color, and the taste has mellowed quite a bit. The roasted flavor is smoother, and so is the aftertaste, making it seem even more like a Wuyi. The roasted taste also lingered pleasantly in my hard palate for over a minute, rounding off a very nice second infusion. I have to confess, this tea is much better than I remember, and the rating is getting bumped up again.

ALright, I had two more cups of this, and it was pretty good, but I got interrupted by some eleictical work that my dad was doing, so I; didn;t have electricity to post about it here. The TL;DR is that it was much better than I remember, and I’m really glad I git 100 grams of this tea.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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