Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

Iron Boddhisattva Classic Roast

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Ron Gilmour
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

1 Want it Want it

4 Own it Own it

2 Tasting Notes View all

From Tea Gallery

This heavily roasted tea likes to offer up notes of dark chocolate truffle and raspberry. There’s a deep, nutty aroma that fills the teapot and becomes more fruity with each steep. Soft plummy notes slowly perfume the mouth with each sip. Later infusions reveal the sweet and floral side of TiKwanYin.

About Tea Gallery View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

95
13 tasting notes

Awesome.

Usually brewed gong fu-style.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

94
5 tasting notes

This tea is a bit expensive, but worth it. In fact, I consider it pretty much the perfect oolong. If you like roasted oolongs, you really need to try this. Let’s be clear: this is seriously roasted. If you like your oolongs to be gentle and flowery, this might not be for you. But if you prefer something a little bolder and more substantial, you’ll love this.

A note on the name: The Tea Gallery uses the term "Iron Boddhisattva" for what other vendors call "Tie Guan Yin," perhaps to avoid the messy orthographic variants associated with the more common term. This translation is accurate enough, I guess, but it substitutes the generic term "boddhisattva" for Guan Yin, a specific boddhisattva who embodies mercy and who is especially dear to East Asian Buddhists. Tie Guan Yin traditionally comes from the Anxi province of China, although some are now grown in Taiwan.

This is a tea that benefits from a little thought in brewing. Done wrong, a tea with such a strong roast can just taste burnt. I brew it in a gaiwan and use lots o’ leaf, but very short steeps (< 1 min. in the earlier ones). I throw out the first steep. The liquor is a beautiful red-amber. The aroma will remind you of a campfire. The flavor is surprisingly complex, with chocolate prominent, but with notes of stone fruits and a subtle mineral quality. As you proceed with multiple steeps, the roasted chocolaty flavors recede and the fruity qualities come forward. This is one of the most fun things about the tea: there is so much difference between the early steeps and later ones. It’s beautiful to watch the tea evolve over the course of an afternoon. The downside to that is that you’ll likely keep drinking it and drinking it to see where it will go and before you know it you’ll have drunk ungodly quantities of tea and won’t be able to go to sleep.

Wiseman Tea Co.

“The downside to that is that you’ll likely keep drinking it and drinking it to see where it will go and before you know it you’ll have drunk ungodly quantities of tea and won’t be able to go to sleep.”
I know this predicament all too well, sigh…

Login or sign up to leave a comment.