Feng Huang Dan Cong Honey Orchid Gold Medalist No 1

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Pamela Dean
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I bought this tea mistaking it for the 'commercial' version of a Honey Orchid Phoenix oolong that I had been enjoying so much, and was brought up short by some harsher notes it expressed on first...” Read full tasting note
    90
    teaddict 311 tasting notes
  • “I always really enjoy this. It's wonderful, and the people I share it with agree. It's not hard to brew, either. Good to the last possible sip, and the aroma in the cup is still something I...” Read full tasting note
    Christeana 50 tasting notes

From Tea Habitat

This tea is harvested from a single tree which has entered many national and international tea competitions and won numerous prizes since the 70’s, often the first prize-Gold Medalist winner.

Aroma of this tea is sweet orchid floral. Orchid is an elusive term to describe aroma. Orchid is the most praised flower in Chinese culture. There are many species of orchid which aren’t related in botanical family. Even within the orchid botanical family, there are over 50,000 varietals, some are fragrant, some aren’t, and some are smelly. In this case, I can’t define a particular flower to describe the aroma of this tea. It’s beautiful without a doubt, not over powering with a soothing nature.

Flavor is aromatic as well that lingers in your mouth, you may find it in your breath soon after drinking. Sweet honey taste lasts many infusions.

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3 Tasting Notes

90
311 tasting notes

I bought this tea mistaking it for the ‘commercial’ version of a Honey Orchid Phoenix oolong that I had been enjoying so much, and was brought up short by some harsher notes it expressed on first brewing. I looked again at the label and realized this was the single-bush Dan Cong version, and unsurprisingly it demands a bit more respect.

Tonight I am brewing it in the Chao Zhou pot I bought from Tea Habitat, and it is lovely. It’s flavors are sharper, spicier, and sweetness is more honeyed and distinct. It is like the prior tea brought into sharper focus.

So far I am on about the 9th or 10th infusion, and anticipate plenty more infusions are left in it.

I used about 2 grams of tea in the 60 mL pot, and infusions from 30 seconds at first to 1-2 minutes now, water 195 degrees, give or take 5, and the entirety of this gongfu session has been delightful.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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50 tasting notes

I always really enjoy this. It’s wonderful, and the people I share it with agree. It’s not hard to brew, either. Good to the last possible sip, and the aroma in the cup is still something I linger over, when it’s done.

I use a Brita filter on my faucet, and for many things, it’s fine. But for the oolongs I have been exploring, the water seemed to be getting in the way. I’m so over bottled water, and I don’t live by a stream……So lately I have been using a piece of bamboo charcoal in the kettle, when I boil water for tea or miso soup. It seems to act as a filter, and also mineralize the water, to some extent. It’s made a huge difference, with the results being amazing pots of tea. Should have tried this long ago.

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