2007 Sheng Puer Supreme

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Pu Erh Tea
Flavors
Ash, Astringent, Bitter, Bitter Melon, Drying, Mineral, Smoke, Sour, Tobacco, Vegetal, Wet Moss, Wet Rocks, Autumn Leaf Pile, Dirt, Wet Earth
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
High
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Cameron B.
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 0 sec 7 g 11 oz / 327 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “One of my sipdown goals this year was to do more gong fu brewing. This is a type of brewing that simply doesn’t fit into my “normal work week” (which involved taking either a warm thermos or cold...” Read full tasting note
    40
  • “It’s time for the 12th day of Sara’s Old Tea! These wet leaves smell like wet leaves! It tastes like wet leaves too, and I’m not getting a whole lot of complexity from this one. It’s like sitting...” Read full tasting note
    66

From TeaSource

A classic, aged, tippy, loose leaf sheng puer with lots of body, earthiness, and a hint of crispness. It evokes a clean and refreshing feeling.

The flavor of all Puer teas evolves over time. This is because during storage there are naturally occurring active micro-organisms in the leaf, which change the aroma and the flavor of the tea over time. All dark teas (including Puer) can be wonderful when they are “young” i.e., less than 2 years old. Each year after that, the flavor will get a little richer, deeper, more complex. Many people store dark teas, particularly Puers, for years before drinking, because they really enjoy that more fully evolved, more complex, stronger flavor. So feel free to experiment with steeping times and storage times, to find the best method to get the flavor you want from your dark tea.

Suggested Steeping Instruction:

Use 1 rounded tsp (3 grams) per 8-16 oz of water, rinse leaves with 205° water for 4-8 seconds, discard rinse water. Then steep with 8 oz water at 205° for 8-20 seconds. Good for multiple steepings. Steeping for longer time periods will produce a progressively stronger cup.

Ingredients:

Chinese Puer

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2 Tasting Notes

40
824 tasting notes

One of my sipdown goals this year was to do more gong fu brewing. This is a type of brewing that simply doesn’t fit into my “normal work week” (which involved taking either a warm thermos or cold water bottle of tea with me to work and drinkng that for the full eight hours, then having to switch to herbal infusions after I get home). So I’m trying to get in a session on my weekends off, and since I took next week off for staycation (gotta use-it-or-lose-it with the vacaton time), perhaps I’ll manage a few more over the week.

I tend to sort of “ignore” or “avoid” the pu’erh in my collection for a few reasons: firstly, I just can’t seem to warm up to the taste of it no matter how hard I try, how I brew it, what have you, which leads to the second, I tell myself that just maybe it won’t taste so foul if I “let it age” for eons in the back of the cupboard (so far, this never seems to work out for me though). This particular one I remember ordering some time ago at my local coffee haunt, Twin Beans, which sources a small amount of teas from TeaSource. They only do western brewing with small teapots there, I thought it tasted ghastly (but made it through my pot), and decided to buy some of the leaf from them because somewhere in my head I thought it would magically “be better” if brewed gong fu style instead. I never wanted an ounce of pu, but they sold by the ounce, so that was the smallest amount I could get. So I have more of this than I care to have, and it is probably time to see if brewing it gong fu actually makes it any better…

180ml mini pot | 9g | 205F | Rinse/10s/13s/16s/19s/22s

The wet leaf aroma after the rinse is that of bitter melon, sour vegetables, and a bit of tobacco smoke. The liquor of the first infusion smells the same. It… still tastes ghastly to me. It’s the tobacco taste! That may just be my most disliked note in all of tea-dom, banana-aversion aside. It’s just thick and coating and so prevalent I can’t even try to focus on any of the other flavors in the tea. Just so bitter and ashy. Ugh. The second infusion shows a bit of improvement; I’m still getting a sticky, drying tobacco smoke taste left on my tongue which is highly unpleasant, but during the sip the flavor is more of a slightly sour vegetal note, with a bit of that “marshy” taste I typically get from pu’erh. Third infusion became even more of that “swamp marsh” taste, which isn’t my favorite, but much better than the tobacco/bitter tastes. It became easier to drink the further into infusions I went, but never became “enjoyable” for me. Even when the sip became easier to swallow, I always had a somewhat bitter and ashy aftertaste that I just couldn’t get behind. I surprised myself for making it through five steeps.

Definitely not my cuppa, mostly because of the tobacco notes. I don’t like greens with that taste, either. Might sound sacriledge, but I think I’m going to add peppermint to the rest and try cold brewing and see if I can’t get more of a Moroccan Mint taste where the peppermint masks the tobacco taste a bit (as it does with Gunpowder Green, another tea I don’t like because of the tobacco flavors), as I find that easier to swallow. There is simply no way I’d finish off the rest of the leaf this way.

Flavors: Ash, Astringent, Bitter, Bitter Melon, Drying, Mineral, Smoke, Sour, Tobacco, Vegetal, Wet Moss, Wet Rocks

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 9 g 6 OZ / 180 ML
Cameron B.

The fact that you hated it and bought some anyway is hysterical… XD

Mastress Alita

I know! I get this idea in my head that somehow gong fu is the “right way” to drink certain teas so, obviously, the fact the teashop served it western had to be the problem and I had to prove myself right.

……………I was wrong.

Cameron B.

Well I think it’s sweet of you to give it a fair chance! ;)

Martin Bednář

2007 sheng… well that’s oldie!

Mastress Alita

It doesn’t seem to matter how old it is, I still don’t like it. :-( I think this idea that they “get better with age” doesn’t work on me…

Todd

It was pretty “meh” to me brewed western… not good but not horrible, lol. I definitely won’t be buying any.

tea-sipper

I hope you have a most enjoyable staycation!

Mastress Alita

I’m, admittedly, starting to go a bit stir crazy (I want OUT and DOING THINGS already!) but at least I’m being paid to not be at work. :-)

AJRimmer

Yeah, I’ll probably max out on vacation hours before my job goes back to in person, but I’ll hate having to use them for not vacations!

Mastress Alita

I have to use up two weeks worth by March or they will be lost, so I have little choice! I have another week of staycation in February just to use it all up…

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66
121 tasting notes

It’s time for the 12th day of Sara’s Old Tea!

These wet leaves smell like wet leaves!

It tastes like wet leaves too, and I’m not getting a whole lot of complexity from this one. It’s like sitting on a pile of autumn leaves in the rain, sipping some tea. I’m getting some dirt notes too. That said, it’s not bad. It would probably benefit from a full gongfu session, but I brewed it western style.

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Dirt, Vegetal, Wet Earth

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 2 min, 0 sec 5 g 16 OZ / 473 ML

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