John said

Can anyone speculate on this teapot?

Specifically do you think it is good clay? It’s certainly over 10 years old but how old would you guess? Couldn’t find any stamp.

https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/[email protected]/29848493456/
https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/[email protected]/29800413211/
https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/[email protected]/29800441631/

8 Replies
AllanK said

I would say try to find out about the maker of the pot but it has no maker’s stamp on the bottom of the pot. I think this would indicate it was mass produced as opposed to produced by an individual artisan. Some one with more knowledge than me may be able to guess the age from the patina of stains inside the pot.

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John said

Thank you. I’m hoping it’s significant so I can get my neighbors interested in good tea. It’s their pot.

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t-curious said

Is ther a stamp inside? The reason I ask is I recently saw a video of a pot maker and he put a stamp inside.

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TeaLife.HK said

Might well be a Japanese pot

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John said

No stamp inside from my quick look.

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Cwyn said

This is a clay pot designed for boiling heicha or puerh over a charcoal stove. You can find the appropriate stoves at Chawangshop for a very low price.

The puerh commonly used for boiling in a pot like this can be huang pian or shou, Lao Cha Tou is a good boiler. Dark heicha brick tea is more traditional, when the tea is boiling, salt, sugar or butter may be added.

TeaLife.HK said

After reading your post, I’m tempted to buy a set on Taobao. I’ll need to set it up on bricks at my office so I don’t damage the floor, but it will keep my office warmer in winter! :)

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John said

Cool ok thanks for the help. Should we try it with some cheap stuff?

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