Butterscotch

Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
Cinnamon, Flavors, Marigold, Pink Peppercorn, White Tea
Flavors
Butterscotch, Sweet, Butter, Caramel, Coconut, Creamy, Popcorn, Vegetal
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Mastress Alita
Average preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 3 min, 0 sec 2 g 9 oz / 259 ml

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11 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This one is nagging me! It tastes like something VERY familiar yet I can’t place it and no its not butterscotch candies lol – its something else. Aruggggg I will figure it out and update. Well if...” Read full tasting note
  • “Backlog: Thank you Azzrian for sending me some of this tea. I liked it, but it was still a bit disappointing to me. I didn’t taste butterscotch. I tasted white tea, cinnamon and pepper. I like...” Read full tasting note
    63
  • “With sugar: Very pale color. I really like the aroma, but the taste isn’t quite as compelling. It is nearly all butterscotch; the tea flavor gets a bit lost, though it does poke through. The...” Read full tasting note
    86
  • “I purchased this tea as part of a holiday sampler from Art of Tea. I LOVE THIS TEA! I will be purchasing more when my sample is gone. The taste is just like the comforting butterscotch candies my...” Read full tasting note
    100

From Art of Tea

One of the world’s most beloved confections has found its way into your teacup. Embrace the buttery warmth of this golden hued white tea infusion as it dances on your palette and illuminates your soul.

Water Temperature: 175-185 F degrees
Caffeine Content: Medium
Steep Time: 1-3 minutes
Suggested Serving Size: 1 Tbsp/8oz
Ingredients: Organic White Tea, Organic Cinnamon, Organic Pink Peppercorn, Organic Marigolds, Natural Flavors
Origin: Art of Tea Blend

About Art of Tea View company

Art of Tea is a tea importer and wholesaler based in Los Angeles, California. We hand blend and custom craft the world’s finest organic teas and botanicals. Our teas are carefully selected directly from growers, each one offering a unique story.

11 Tasting Notes

807 tasting notes

This one is nagging me! It tastes like something VERY familiar yet I can’t place it and no its not butterscotch candies lol – its something else.
Aruggggg I will figure it out and update.
Well if you read the notes below the post I think I figured it out.
Regardless this one gets passed on to my sororitea sister LiberTEAS

Ellyn

I LOVE Art of Tea’s Butterscotch. One of my all time favorite.

Azzrian

Your review is why I got it :) I LOVE butterscotch anything – and this is good but I am still freaking out over what the heck this reminds me of!
LOL

Ellyn

Good Luck! Post when/if you figure it out :)

Azzrian

Well I think I know … but Im not positive. There were these candies back in the day lol Im 43 so this was when I was a small kid … they were like cheap lifesavers. They were round, but instead of a hole they had a little dent in the center. I usually ate the cherry flavored ones. Now this does not taste like cherry tea – but the candy itself had this BASE flavor that all of the candies had regardless of if you were eating cherry, or lime, or butterscotch etc….so it is the flavor of the candy base itself I think I am getting here.

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63
4843 tasting notes

Backlog:

Thank you Azzrian for sending me some of this tea.

I liked it, but it was still a bit disappointing to me. I didn’t taste butterscotch. I tasted white tea, cinnamon and pepper. I like cinnamon, pepper, and white tea … so it tasted good. But it didn’t taste like butterscotch, and I really wanted it to. The earthiness of the white tea melded quite nicely with the earthy tones of the spice notes. But there just wasn’t enough butterscotch to this to make me happy.

A tea that is called Butterscotch should taste … well, like butterscotch.

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86
316 tasting notes

With sugar: Very pale color. I really like the aroma, but the taste isn’t quite as compelling. It is nearly all butterscotch; the tea flavor gets a bit lost, though it does poke through. The flavor is remarkably complex, with hints of pineapple and grapefruit. I’m not sure how much is the tea and how much is flavoring, but the overall result is quite nice.

2nd pot: I usually use sugar in my flavored teas, but on a whim I decided to not use sugar, and was surprised by how much better I liked the tea. It had a lot of nuance that I missed before. The butterscotch flavor was still dominant, especially in the nose, but I really enjoyed the white tea flavors as well. The re-steep was nearly as good. Definitely a keeper

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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100
230 tasting notes

I purchased this tea as part of a holiday sampler from Art of Tea.

I LOVE THIS TEA! I will be purchasing more when my sample is gone. The taste is just like the comforting butterscotch candies my grandpa used to have in his pocket. The mouth feel is a little thick but not syrupy and perfectly matches the flavor. The WHite tea is a subtle compliment to the flavor.

Preparation
4 min, 30 sec

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65
301 tasting notes

When I opened the sample tin, the aroma was wonderful – sweet like butterscotch. As I steeped the tea, the smell intensified – yummy! I could not wait for the first taste – I love butterscotch! Disappointed – the cup of tea is OK but I do not taste butterscotch; the pepper taste is unusual but no butterscotch. Sweetener should help bring out the butterscotch, right? Nope, I taste a little sweetness but no butterscotch.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 2 min, 30 sec

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88
536 tasting notes

Holiday Tea-son! Some time ago, I had sampled a Butterscotch White tea that I got in a holiday sampler pack from Art of Tea, which I reviewed here: https://steepster.com/mastressalita/posts/365383 . I really enjoyed it, but instead of restocking it from Art of Tea (since they are quite expensive), I found a close match for it from Tealyra at the time, called “Butterscotch Potion,” as it was on a big discount, so I bought a bag there instead. All the ingredients listed were the same. Tealyra no longer carries the blend, but I know Tealyra gets their flavored blends by wholesaling, so I was trying to dig into where they sourced the blend. I could find lots of other tea sites carrying the same blend, and all of them had the blend as a fall/winter seasonal… the same as Art of Tea. Hmmmmmmmm. This led me to believe that Tealyra, and all the other sites were all wholesaling it directly from Art of Tea (Art of Tea lists that the origin of their blend is an “Art of Tea original” and I’d hate to think they are saying that while wholesaling it too, and I know Art of Tea themselves have a wholesale option). So, I was going to review this under Tealyra, thinking they’d wholesaled some “duplicate” of the Art of Tea blend but… no, I think I really do have a (much cheaper!) bag of the original Art of Tea blend that I had originally enjoyed so much. I even checked all the major blend wholesalers and am feeling pretty confident here. If nothing else, the over-abundance of “wholesale/relabel culture” from teashops does mean you might find the exact same blend under a different name for a waaaaay better price per ounce somewhere else if you are willing to do a little searching around by ingredient list of your tea of choice…

So I don’t usually review the same tea more than once, but that review was from my baby days on Steepster, and I haven’t had this tea in ages. My tea-brewing game has likely changed quite a bit since then, so I wouldn’t be surprised if my brewed cup, palate, and thus rating has changed as well. So I may as well revisit this one.

I know a year ago, I expected very bold flavors, which I don’t expect so much now; in fact, I now actually prefer a bit more nuance, with the base notes coming through more, and the flavors in the cup to taste more natural than really strong or artificial. So I took care to not put too much leaf in my cup, and I am really enjoying this; it actually has a really nice butterscotch flavor, without tasting overwhelming. There is a silky, buttery mouthfeel to the tea that is very pleasant and satisfying; I feel like I pick up a slight coconut milk sort of flavor note, which may have a lot to do with the creamy texture? Before the tea reminded me of Werthers, but that was probably from overleafing or adding sugars, things I don’t do now; I’d say it’s a more subtle butterscotch flavor, present but not overbearing on the white tea, with lots of sweet buttery notes, and hints of caramel. Almost like a caramel popcorn sort of taste that pops toward the end of the sip. There seems to be some vegetal notes lingering in the cup, but the sweetness and buttery notes keep them very muted.

It’s a really nice dessert tea, and very relaxing. I think I like this a bit more than I remember, because I think I can appreciate some of the more nuanced flavors a bit more now than I could a year ago. Raising the rating slightly!

Flavors: Butter, Butterscotch, Caramel, Coconut, Creamy, Popcorn, Sweet, Vegetal

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 3 min, 0 sec 2 g 12 OZ / 350 ML
AJRimmer

What’s your method for figuring out which teas are relabeled and where they come from originally? I’ve tried to figure this out in the past, but websites don’t seem to be very transparent about where their teas come from. I would love to know so I could price shop better in the future!

Mastress Alita

They really are not transparent. It’s the curse of the wholesale/relabeling culture and I sort of hate it. I don’t care that they are selling teas that come from other sources, but as a librarian, I have this “cite your damn source!” mentality ingrained in me. I do have some training as a reference librarian from library science courses (though I’m actually a cataloger at my library!) so I am a bit good at snooping around online, but still a lot of it comes down to deduction and making best assumptions in many cases. Using tea ingredient lists is the main factor. If a lot of small, independent tea sites all list a tea that has the exact same ingredients in the blend, even if the tea has “different names”, it is pretty much a sure sign they are all getting it from the same wholesale source, since they can relabel the blend with any name and list their own shop as the “source”. Since these are all the same blend, then you can basically look between these sites to see who is offering the best price-per-ounce, shipping, etc. for the blend.

When I’m trying to discover the source of a flavored blend, there are four major wholesale sources that don’t sell directly to consumers, and I tend to check their blends first: ITI (International Tea Importers), Metropolitan Tea Company, East Indies Coffee & Tea Company, and Dethlefsen & Balk. The majority of most flavored blends on tea sites come from one of those four companies, which is why it’s so easy to just get the exact same tea from a different tea shop. (For example, I’ve recently run into Dethlefsen & Balk blends on Fusion Teas, Tealyra, and The Angry Tea Room). If I don’t find an ingredient match from the teas of those “big four”, then I start looking at the “big popular” tea companies that also offer wholesale options: Adagio, Harney & Sons, Tea Guys, Art of Tea, etc. You’d be surprised how many smaller brick and morter tea shops actually buy teas from other retailers that are available directly to consumers and aren’t “wholesale only”, and then simply change the name of the blend (and sometimes don’t, even using the exact same blend name!) and then sell it for a way higher price-per-ounce. The closest tea shop to me (which is still two hours away), Snake River Tea in Boise, I’ve found Adagio tea blends being sold for $4 an ounce! I get that they have a brick and morter store, and that requires rent and upkeep, but seriously… why would I ever pay that when that same tea is available to me on their website for $8 for 3 oz?

Sometimes I’m able to Nancy Drew out the source, sometimes I can’t find it despite my best efforts, and sometimes I’m making my best guess/assumption based on everything I’ve found.

AJRimmer

Thanks for your very thorough response! I really do wish brands would tell you where their teas are from, mostly because I want to support small brands while also not ordering lots of duplicates. But if that’s not to be, now I know where to look, so thanks!

lizwykys

Ditto that AJRimmer! I’ve read some of your thoughts about this before, Mastress Alita, but thanks for such an in-depth explanation!

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82
73 tasting notes

This is a great sweet treat for evening. This tea does actually taste of butterscotch without being too cloyingly sweet (I find that a lot of blends advertising this flavor end up falling short). It’s one of the very few white tea blends that I own, and I really like that I can taste the tea itself in conjunction with the sweet butterscotch flavor. I used a tablespoon of tea for an 8oz cup.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 2 min, 0 sec 8 OZ / 236 ML

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100
7 tasting notes

I tried this tea at a tea shop in Corpus Christi, and I loved it. At home, it tastes just as wonderful as I remember. The taste of butterscotch candies is strong, but there is something very pure and natural about the tea, so that there is no fake quality about it.

The color of the tea is pale, but the taste is strong. The loose tea leaves are the most beautiful I have seen, stiff and silver-green, mixed with marigold petals and red berries. It looks as though it was mixed together just recently.

The container it came in has a metal stopper to preserve the freshness of the loose tea. It is well-made, and I will be able to use it again for other tea purchases.

On the whole, I am very impressed with this tea, and I am interested to try other teas from The Art of Tea.

Flavors: Butterscotch

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

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1008 tasting notes

I plucked this out of a traveling tea box to try! It came in a bag that says it appears identical to Tealux’s Butterscotch Potion and it looks about the same as a sample I have of Persimmon Tree’s Butterscotch. It tastes about the same as PT’s version too. It is nice, smooth… a little butterscotch on the sip and more in the aftertaste. I could drink more of this and I think I will!

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 0 sec

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81
218 tasting notes

TTBC2 #16

I generally prefer my white teas to be fruit flavored rather than dessert-candy-creamy flavored, but this blend is pulled off real nicely.

I have noticed that if I like the look of a blend’s dry leaf, I usually like the steep it makes. So was with this one. Adorable little peppercorns among beautiful, intact white tea leaves. And gorgeous-smelling. Just like butterscotch. And I am not even a great fan of buttercotch, but this tea smelled heavenly.

It turned out to be delicious as well. Strong buttescotch, caramel and cream notes that nevertheless did not overwhelm the delicate nature of white tea. What’s not to love? A very well done dessert white blend!

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 2 min, 15 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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