Korea Dong Cheon Sejak Jaksulcha Semi-Wild Green Tea

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Green Tea
Flavors
Green, Peas, Sweet, Corn Husk, Grass
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Gooseberry Spoon
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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Another nice Korean green tea. Description is perfect, green taste (i get peas) transition into sweet corn. Green aroma, perhaps a slight nice bitter along the sweetness, compared to some of the...” Read full tasting note
    94
  • “1st steep 160 35 sec Brews to a light green color. Taste is grassy but not bitter. There is a sweet corn taste, like the fresh green husks of the corn, and corn silk. Steeped leaves a fantastic...” Read full tasting note

From What-Cha

A Sejak (second picking of the year) Korean green tea featuring a brilliant fresh green aroma with a smooth sweet grassy taste which transitions into a lingering corn taste.

Sourced direct from Dong Cheon, a co-operative of small farmers with the goal of maintaining Korea’s rich history of tea.

Tasting Notes:
- Fresh green aroma with corn hints
- Smooth and sweet grass taste which transitions to a lingering corn

Harvest: Sejak (Spring), 20-23rd April 2016

Origin: Dong Cheon a co-operative of small farmers, Hwagae Valley, Jirisan, Hadong, Korea
Organic: Certified organic
Cultivar: Hadong (Descendants of the first tea brought in to Korea roughly 1,200 years ago)

Sourced: Direct from Il-nam Ha the president of Dong Cheon
Percentage of price going back to Dong Cheon: 40%+

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 70°C/158°F
- Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 30-45 seconds

Packaging: Resealable ziplock bag

About What-Cha View company

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2 Tasting Notes

94
338 tasting notes

Another nice Korean green tea. Description is perfect, green taste (i get peas) transition into sweet corn. Green aroma, perhaps a slight nice bitter along the sweetness, compared to some of the other Korean offerings.

Managed to get a nice second cup too.

Flavors: Green, Peas, Sweet

tanluwils

I’ve been looking to get me some nice Korean green tea, but it’s always over my by budget. Oh, and by the way, I received the 7536 yesterday! I’m going to let it acclimate for a month or so.

Rasseru

Great. You should try some, these are similar to your mao fengs and long jins, but their own thing

tanluwils

There is a nice Korean tea house in Manhattan called Franchia that serves/sells excellent sejak green tea, but at a premium. I think $30 for 50g.

Rasseru

I can’t think of one in London! Maybe some cheaper tea from a restaurant but that’s about it

Leafhopper

I’ve always been turned off by the high cost of Korean tea, especially because greens aren’t my favourite. I was also underwhelmed by Teavana’s Jeju Island Green. However, your two tasting notes might change that. Moreover, after Jiri Horse, some more balhyocha might be in my future.

What-Cha

With Korean tea it’s important to keep a few things in mind:

1) Jeju grown tea is a lot lower quality (due to cultivars and geography) and quite different from traditional Korean tea, it’s best to treat it as something different.

2) Korean tea which is hand picked and processed is very expensive due to the high labour costs in South Korea. You can get cheaper but it has to be a later picking (Daejak) which has larger sized leaves (larger leaves weigh more so are less labour intensive to pick a given weight) coupled with machine processing. It’s why I’ve found Dong Cheon’s Daejak to be the perfect starting point for Korean greens as it’s not expensive while being representative of what to expect from the more expensive earlier pickings.

Leafhopper

Thanks for the info. I figured Teavana wouldn’t have top-flight Korean tea. I might have to pick up some Daejak from you when my tea cupboard is a little emptier.

tanluwils

I’ve had some nice Korean greens when I was traveling in the Hadong, Gimhae, and Busan area, and I do think it’s worth a try. Personally, I still don’t think it’s worth the price for everyday consumption, since I can get something of comparable quality from China (hand picked!) or Japan for far less. I think it’s more of a fad in the West that will pass with time. Perhaps something as unique as Balhyocha or hwangcha will always have a place in the Western tea world.

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101 tasting notes

1st steep 160 35 sec
Brews to a light green color. Taste is grassy but not bitter. There is a sweet corn taste, like the fresh green husks of the corn, and corn silk. Steeped leaves a fantastic bright green color.

2nd steep 160 45 sec
Color of the tea is still lighter than I would expect of the leaves. There’s more grassiness here and less of the corn. A bit of a savory seaweed note has appeared.

3rd steep ~150F ~1.5 min
Sweeter, a light bitterness that coats the mouth

4th steep
Very sweet, less bitterness

https://www.instagram.com/p/BINrHTAj9kM/?taken-by=gooseberryspoon
https://www.instagram.com/p/BINgp-MDCGr/?taken-by=gooseberryspoon

Flavors: Corn Husk, Grass

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