Taiwan Wild 'Shan Cha' Black Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Blackberry, Honey, Sage, Sweet, Thick, Green Wood
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Rasseru
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Thank you, Alistair! I’ve been looking at this one for a while and glad to try it. I went with 2 minutes Western in my gaiwan with 194 F and an eyeballed amount of leaves. I used between 3-4 grams...” Read full tasting note
    92
  • “I really didnt want any black tea, malt is not my thing at all. so much tea with ‘golden’ in the title lying around not being finished I try not to buy any more. But this one came recommended from...” Read full tasting note
    92

From What-Cha

A thick sweet blackberry aroma coupled with an incredibly smooth honey sweet taste and spicy blackberry notes.

A most unique tea which is indigenous to Taiwan and still grows wild in certain areas. It is rarely sold as the plant loses it’s distinct characteristics when cultivated and so the only tea production is from the surviving wild growing bushes.

Tasting Notes:
- Thick sweet aroma with notes of blackberry
- Smooth honey sweet taste with spicy blackberry notes

Harvest: Summer, August 2016

Origin: Yuchi Township, Nantou County, Taiwan
Altitude: 500-600m
Producer: Mr. Pong
Sourced: Specialist Taiwanese tea wholesaler

Cultivar: Shan Cha (wild growing tea bush indigenous to Taiwan)
Picking: Hand

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

92
889 tasting notes

Thank you, Alistair! I’ve been looking at this one for a while and glad to try it. I went with 2 minutes Western in my gaiwan with 194 F and an eyeballed amount of leaves. I used between 3-4 grams of the wiry leaves and got five brews out.

The first steep was the best, and the blackberry notes were thick and sweet followed by the greenwood honey aftertaste Rasseru mentioned, or the spiciness that Alistair described. It made me think of a few blackberry sage flavored teas I’ve had before, only it was not as malty. I could even think of the blackberry sage chocolate bars I used to hoard. The notes did not change too much in the later steeps. The blackberry-spice flavor got lighter, but the texture remained.

As prominent as the notes are, they were very balanced you could still tell that this was a black tea. It reminded me more of a Alishan black tea I’ve had before. I’m also glad that it was not as brisk or astringent as a Taiwan Assam. One review on What-Cha’s website even described it as soft, and it is on the softer side for black teas.

I would probably get this again in a 50 gram amount if I had the option of it again. If only I did not already have a lot of tea. I think this tea is good for general audiences- it has enough complexity for people to like it for notes, but it’s also easy to drink as a black tea on its own. It might be too light for cream and sugar, but I’d have to try that to be certain. I’d still prefer this straight gong fu or western. I’ll write more later.

Flavors: Blackberry, Honey, Sage, Sweet, Thick

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92
288 tasting notes

I really didnt want any black tea, malt is not my thing at all. so much tea with ‘golden’ in the title lying around not being finished I try not to buy any more. But this one came recommended from Alistair, and I liked the description so I went for some – & really glad I did.

Possibly one of the nicest black teas I have tried. It has a fruity blackberry taste & aroma, with honey-sweet smoothness, & an slight oily leaf taste reminiscent of wuyi yancha running through it. In fact it has the taste of a steeped wuyi, you know when the roast has gone and you are left with the leafy taste (in a good way?) it kinda has that, under the bolder black tea taste. It also has a nice tongue-whetting aspect from the sweetness.

If you like the other smoother black teas that what-cha have/had (the georgian one springs to mind) or just want something slightly different from the usual golden malty blacks, you should consider trying this, the blackberry fruit really lifts it into special territory.

I have been drinking it gongfu, but I’m pretty sure a well made cup of this would sing at the right times.

Flavors: Blackberry, Green Wood, Honey

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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