India Assam Joypur Small-Holder Hand-Made Black Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Autumn Leaf Pile, Butter, Caramel, Chestnut, Cocoa, Grass, Hazelnut, Honey, Malt, Molasses, Toast, Wood
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Rinmori
Average preparation
5 min, 0 sec 3 g 8 oz / 236 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I started working on a sample pouch of this tea prior to going to work this morning. In my opinion, there is nothing quite as effective as Assam when it comes to getting one started in the morning....” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “Fragrant, woodsy malt is immediately present and reveals a fruity nuance; pear and apple. This is accompanied by a slight bite, and the liquor is fairly thick on the tongue. Altogether, a robust...” Read full tasting note

From What-Cha

A smooth malty whole leaf black tea with lovely milk chocolate tones. It has been lovingly hand-crafted without the use of any machinery by local workers on their own small farm plots.

A growing trend is developing in Assam, whereby farmers are now hand-processing their own tea in small batches rather than selling their leaves to large factories.

This tea has been sourced direct from Manish whose family has run Bhartia Tea Estate for the past eighty years.

Recently, some of Manish’s workers have started producing hand-crafted teas from leaves grown on their own small farms utilising traditional processing techniques of hand-rolling the tea.

Although quantities produced are extremely limited due to the labouriously intensive nature of hand-processing teas, they have the advantage of exhibiting lots of character and nuances which would otherwise be lost in factory produced teas.

About What-Cha View company

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2 Tasting Notes

75
667 tasting notes

I started working on a sample pouch of this tea prior to going to work this morning. In my opinion, there is nothing quite as effective as Assam when it comes to getting one started in the morning. Unfortunately, this one did not do much for me. I don’t feel like I was able to get it quite right.

I prepared this tea Western style. I tried to prepare this tea two ways. First, I steeped 4 grams of loose tea leaves in 8 ounces of 194 F water for 5 minutes. I later steeped 3 grams of loose tea leaves in 8 ounces of 194 F for 3 minutes. Both preparations produced extremely similar results.

Both infusions produced a mellow woodsy, malty bouquet with hints of caramel, butter, and molasses. In the mouth, I mostly picked up butter, malt, and wood notes with hints of honey, molasses, cream, chestnut, hazelnut, and brown toast. There was very little astringency or bitterness, which was nice, but I didn’t find much to latch onto period.

I don’t know about this tea. I’m going to try it again later, but so far, I do not have particularly strong feelings about it either way. Normally, the so-called golden ratio of 3 grams of loose tea per 8 ounces of water (and I never fill my teacups to the brim, so I’m never really using a full 8 ounces) works for me, but I don’t feel like it did here. Looking at the leaves too, I could tell that this was a high quality tea. It just didn’t do much for me. It came across as being timid and stuffy.

ADDENDUM: I just finished the final 3 grams of the sample pouch, and I have to say that I like this tea a little more now. It had kind of a leafiness and grassiness up front that I hadn’t noticed before. It also had a touch of cocoa that I picked up on the finish. Compared to many of the Assams I have tried, this one was very light and mellow. I found this tea to be a very backloaded tea in the sense that, for me, the flavor was at its best, boldest, and most complex right around the swallow. It still wasn’t really my thing, but I could see this being good for someone who wants the caffeine punch of Assam or other strong black teas, but doesn’t necessarily want the heavy maltiness, syrupy mouthfeel, or pronounced astringency.

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Butter, Caramel, Chestnut, Cocoa, Grass, Hazelnut, Honey, Malt, Molasses, Toast, Wood

Preparation
5 min, 0 sec 3 g 8 OZ / 236 ML

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60 tasting notes

Fragrant, woodsy malt is immediately present and reveals a fruity nuance; pear and apple. This is accompanied by a slight bite, and the liquor is fairly thick on the tongue. Altogether, a robust tea that I found enjoyable, though sensitive to oversteeping.

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