Vietnam 'Medium-Roast Jin Xuan' Red Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Cedar, Cherry, Coconut, Dark Chocolate, Dark Wood, Fruity, Honey, Molasses, Nuts, Resin, Sweet, Thick, Toasted Rice, Butter, Chocolate, Cocoa, Cream, Malt, Raisins, Raspberry, Roasted, Almond, Caramel, Char, Grass, Mineral, Plums, Straw, Toast, Vanilla, Vegetal, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Roswell Strange
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 45 sec 7 g 6 oz / 173 ml

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7 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Another from Kawaii433! Thanks so much! These dark oolongs are usually not my thing at all, but I’m always very thrilled to try a teaspoon or two. :D I’m intrigued by the ‘red’ in the name. ...” Read full tasting note
    84
  • “This is a very nice medium to full bodied tea that combines nicely the fruity sweetness and roasted notes. Its smell is thick and sweet with notes like cherry, dark wood and molasses. The liquor is...” Read full tasting note
    91
  • “Been drinking this throughout the week, and I am really enjoying it. I thought the sticky rice was my favorite out of this package but then I really like this one too. I feel fickle when I drink...” Read full tasting note
    95
  • “For the second review of the evening, I will be offering my thoughts on another tea I drank recently. I finished my sample pouch of this tea around the middle of last week. I found it to be a very...” Read full tasting note
    88

From What-Cha

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Sweet honey taste
- Lingering notes of roasted cacao

Harvest: Spring, March 2017

Origin: Phuc Tho, Lam Ha, Lam Dong Province, Vietnam
Altitude: 1,000-1,100m
Sourced: Direct from the Vietnamese producer

Cultivar: Jin Xuan (TTES #12)
Oxidisation: High
Roast: Medium
Picking: Hand picked

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 2-3 minutes

Packaging: Non-resealable vacuum-sealed bag packaged by the producer in Vietnam (50g or larger)

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

7 Tasting Notes

84
2805 tasting notes

Another from Kawaii433! Thanks so much! These dark oolongs are usually not my thing at all, but I’m always very thrilled to try a teaspoon or two. :D I’m intrigued by the ‘red’ in the name. There is a slight red tinge to these charcoal leaves. The bundles are very tightly wrapped. The flavor is charcoal, but not too much – very sweet and syrupy as well. Tastes very mineral and healthy. A nice lingering flavor. Very delicious for a tea that isn’t usually my thing at all. I don’t try enough of these types of teas to tell if this is the best of the best. But as usual, a very tough tea for me to describe. My tastebuds draw a blank on these types, unlike some other extravagant tea notes.
I really want to buy some of the What-cha Sticky rice oolong but I really don’t want to pay $6 shipping for just one tea. I realize they’re a tiny operation, but $6 is a lot of shipping for one tea, even if a couple others are also catching my eye.
Steep #1 // not quite 1 teaspoon for a full mug // 24 minutes after boiling // rinse // 1 1/2 minute steep
Steep #2 // 6 minutes after boiling // 1 1/2 minute steep
Steep #3 // just boiled // 3 min

Kawaii433

You’re very welcome and when I order again, I can get you some Sticky rice oolong and you can piggyback and not pay for shipping… Or I can just send you some of my stash. I still have quite a lot. <3

tea-sipper

Oh that would be awesome of you. I actually wouldn’t mind some of the old stash of Sticky rice… I thought that one was perfect. But I still owe you a package, so we can wait a while.

Leafhopper

I’ve been wanting to try that oolong too, but having 25 or 50 g of something I don’t like is a definite possibility. And yes, paying $6 to ship one tea isn’t worth it. I usually wait till I can exceed the free shipping threshold, which could happen for What-Cha.

Kawaii433

tea-sipper, bah don’t worry about it. I’m still working on sipdowns hehe. I’ll send you some when I go to the post office next week on Mon or Tues.

tea-sipper

Kawaii, if you insist. I REALLY appreciate it. That sticky rice keeps lingering in my mind. :D

tea-sipper

Leafhopper: Yeah, the free shipping limit isn’t too bad for What-cha, I just know I shouldn’t be acquiring ‘free-shipping-limit’ amounts of tea right now. haha

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91
306 tasting notes

This is a very nice medium to full bodied tea that combines nicely the fruity sweetness and roasted notes. Its smell is thick and sweet with notes like cherry, dark wood and molasses. The liquor is bubbly, soft, mouth-watering and gets decently thick throughout the session and also as it cools down. It has a cooling finish.

Taste is quite complex and balanced. Among the notes I found are those of toasted rice, nuts, resin, coconut skin and cedar. I also like the fruity aftertaste that lingers for a while.

I will try to get this one in my next What-Cha order.

Flavors: Cedar, Cherry, Coconut, Dark Chocolate, Dark Wood, Fruity, Honey, Molasses, Nuts, Resin, Sweet, Thick, Toasted Rice

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 30 sec 5 g 7 OZ / 200 ML
Kawaii433

I really enjoyed this review, eastkyteaguy and derk’s review on this. I have it in my cupboard and really love it. As you said, it’s complex but all I know is it tastes really good. ^^ It’s a keeper for me.

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95
288 tasting notes

Been drinking this throughout the week, and I am really enjoying it. I thought the sticky rice was my favorite out of this package but then I really like this one too. I feel fickle when I drink tea. My taste buds and my stomach can be fickle… Sometimes certain tea is comforting and other times, I need to get a bite to eat to continue to ease my tummy.

There are already great reviews on this but here I go.^^ The dry leaf consists of dark little nuggets and has a nice aroma of roast, bittersweet chocolate, vegetal. The wet leaves smell like roasted nuts, chocolate, tamarind fruit. The liquor which is medium-amber smelled like malt, cocoa, roast. It’s complex, and today, the notes I tasted consisted of creamy dark cocoa, like bittersweet chocolate chips, malt, honey, sweet tamarind, roasted nuts, butter, raisins, raspberries, tart cherries.

Note: I always have salted tamarind candy and raw tamarind (not the sweet type but the sour tamarind) as an available snack at home, and there were times some of my infusions reminded me of my tamarind candy. (I just emailed steepster to suggest the tamarind fruit flavor)

Yixing gaiwan, 5g, 110ml, 200°F, 9 steeps, 25s, 35s, 45s, 55s, 1m5s, 1m15s, 1m25s, 1m35s, 1m45s

Flavors: Butter, Cherry, Chocolate, Cocoa, Cream, Fruity, Honey, Malt, Nuts, Raisins, Raspberry, Roasted

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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88
810 tasting notes

For the second review of the evening, I will be offering my thoughts on another tea I drank recently. I finished my sample pouch of this tea around the middle of last week. I found it to be a very nice roasted oolong, though I must admit I have tried way too many roasted Jin Xuan oolongs recently.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of rolled tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 8 seconds. This infusion was chased by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 10 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, and 7 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of cedar, vanilla, raisin, and honey. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of cocoa, char, toast, and black cherry along with a stronger vanilla aroma. The first infusion introduced subtle scents of butter and roasted almond. In the mouth, the tea liquor offered notes of cocoa, cedar, cream, and raisin that chased by impressions of toast, roasted almond, char, vanilla, and honey. Subsequent infusions saw dominant vanilla and cream aromas emerge on the nose along with hints of plum, straw, and caramel. There were stronger vanilla, roasted almond, and toast notes in the mouth, though I also noted the belated emergence of butter and black cherry flavors along with new grass, daylily shoot, mineral, straw, caramel, and plum impressions. The final infusions offered notes of minerals, cream, butter, and cocoa that were balanced by subtler straw, vanilla, cedar, and raisin notes.

An interesting and complex roasted Jin Xuan oolong with a bit of an edge, this was a very satisfying tea overall. That being said, I have tried a couple other roasted Jin Xuan oolongs that were more unique and that struck me as offering a bit more depth and complexity compared to this one. Still, this was a very good tea, and I would not caution anyone interested in Southeast Asian oolongs to avoid it.

Flavors: Almond, Butter, Caramel, Cedar, Char, Cherry, Cocoa, Cream, Grass, Honey, Mineral, Plums, Raisins, Roasted, Straw, Toast, Vanilla, Vegetal

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
derk

Sounds like I’ll have to give this one a whirl gongfu :)

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89
435 tasting notes

Received as a 50g mystery tea.

Gone western. 2 tsp, 205F, 3/5/8min then 10min simmer.

Dry leaf is fragrant, smelling of cacao, caraway seed, roast, wood. Wet leaf after first steep smelled like raspberry, red cherry, roast, caraway seed and green pickle.

A stable and consistent, smooth tea brewed western. Liquor smelled of red fruit, malt, cocoa and orange? and produced a very clear light amber cup, turning to dark amber then light again. The taste had notes of nuts (closest I could get was roasted pecan, maybe brazil nut?), roast, wood, red fruit, cocoa and light mineral with a light sweetness and lingering pleasant aftertaste. The mouthfeel moved from glassy and milky (skim) to thinner and a tad drying, then thicker and slick in the third steep.

Simmering the leaves produced a brilliant and dark orange-red cup smelling of lactose, brown sugar, honey and roasted grains and/or nuts. Hard to say but I couldn’t stop sniffing it. It tasted and felt a lot like boiled milk with the addition of honey and roasted nuts, a hint of cacao and sweet citrus making an appearance in the back of the mouth. No hint of bitterness or astringency. Very comforting. Taste hung around for a long time and my tongue was left tingling. Really interesting! I’m glad I decided to experiment with simmering the leaves of a roasted jin xuan.

I’m pretty impressed with this tea! Check it out. I saw it’s on sale, too. I wish I wasn’t so stocked up at the moment with other teas (plus 2 big pu’er orders coming) or I’d buy more for the winter.

Preparation
2 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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85
8 tasting notes

I got this tea for Christmas and I was quite surprised when I smelled the leaves, as they don’t seem to have a very strong aroma of any kind. You can kind of smell that it’s a roasted Oolong (you can mostly smell the roast), but aside of that, there isn’t a lot you can smell. The leaves after brewing have a really strong smoke-y aroma and almost smell like burnt coal a little bit. The tea’s taste is, despite my expectations, quite smooth yet also strong in flavour. It’s very wooden and charcoal-y and has some nutty flavour as well. I was personally slightly overwhelmed by the intesity of this tea, which might be because I have used too much leaf. As of now, I would personally say that I quite like this tea and if my second tea-session with this tea (and fewer leaves) turns out less overwhelming, I will adjust the score accordingly.

Flavors: Char, Nuts, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 10 g 7 OZ / 200 ML

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