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I haven’t had this tea since summer. There was something about the first day of October and the unseasonably warm rain that seemed to call for Dan Cong. I decided to splurge and filled by little pot (120ml Xi Shi from Tea Habitat) about two thirds full (which is a lot for my budget!). Rinsed as quickly as possible. Then shrimp eyed water. I took two deep breaths and poured. Slip into daydream: In the South where I spent childhood we ate ripe peaches with the peeling on. The peeling adds a very slight dryness without compromising the sweetness. This was the aroma coming from my cup. The aroma seemed to spread out and join the warm rain-cleaned air. I can’t remember how the tea tasted. Second and third infusions, same but three deep breaths; I don’t think I ever broke single digits in seconds, though. The aroma gets heavier: ripe peaches and apricots. The emphasis is still on the aroma, but the taste starts to assert itself. But this is interesting: for the fourth and fifth infusions, the aroma seems to shift to something more floral — ginger flower maybe, but I’ve never smelled a ginger flower that I remember. Definitely less peachy and more flower, though. And the taste is now way up front. More wood and nuts and spice. Dry, spreading horizontal to edges of tongue, brilliant feeling in my throat. I wonder if this one, this infusion, is the tea’s “true” character. I took a walk as the rain withdrew and the back-of-the-throat feel stayed with me. I will try more in the morning.

Preparation
0 min, 15 sec
Thomas Smith

I’m only familiar with California native wild ginger in terms of the flower fragrance. Definitely has a unique, lightly resinous spice note to it. I imagine making a rosewater mixing sorrel leaves and a few cloves in with the rose petals (and maybe an intact bit of cinnamon bark or cedar wood) would produce a distillation that has a similar aroma.

teaddict

Had a delightful session with a Bangwai puerh tonight, but now I want to start over with the Po Tou. I did see lots of wild ginger plants in Hawaii, but do not remember their scent. I will have to try to find it in this tea next time I brew it, maybe tomorrow. Might be time to finally do the Chao Zhou pot vs gaiwan comparison.

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Thomas Smith

I’m only familiar with California native wild ginger in terms of the flower fragrance. Definitely has a unique, lightly resinous spice note to it. I imagine making a rosewater mixing sorrel leaves and a few cloves in with the rose petals (and maybe an intact bit of cinnamon bark or cedar wood) would produce a distillation that has a similar aroma.

teaddict

Had a delightful session with a Bangwai puerh tonight, but now I want to start over with the Po Tou. I did see lots of wild ginger plants in Hawaii, but do not remember their scent. I will have to try to find it in this tea next time I brew it, maybe tomorrow. Might be time to finally do the Chao Zhou pot vs gaiwan comparison.

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A dedicated tea drinker, I focus on teas from China and Taiwan. I favor oolongs and puerhs but also enjoy green teas.

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Boston

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