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60's Ba-Zhong Huang Yin

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by Thomas Smith
Average preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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  • “Prepared 10g in a seasoned 200ml duan ni squat shi piao style Yixing teapot. Rinsed twice to open up and remove small amount of broken down tea dust (rinses immediately poured off - about 10 second...” Read full tasting note
    100
    ThomasSmith 93 tasting notes
  • “Super tea easily the best puerh ever created. I have heard people say that they prefer this to the red mark. I can believe it. Its durability is never ending I brewed this tea for almost three weeks.” Read full tasting note
    100
    gninja 14 tasting notes

From Hou De Asian Art & Fine Teas

Production Year: 60’s

Manufacturer: Meng Hai Factory

Type: aged green cake

Weight: 10g sample

Description: The Ba-Zhong Huang Yin represented the transitional period of 60’s, when the pu-erh production was migrated from the 50’s “Yin Ji” to the centrally-controlled and distributed by CNNP. This also marked the birth of “Chi Tse” beeng. Hence it was selected in the 5th International Puerh Appreciation to let people experience the unique transitional period.

It was indeed a hybrid of 50’s Yin-Ji pu-erhs and 70’s Chi-Tse cakes: the nei fei is still the “Ba-Zhong” nei fei of 50’s, also the leaves and taste largely follow the traits of 50’s. But the wrapper is new: The chi-tse cake’s wrapped with English characters marked the CNNP’s effort to open up export market for pu-erhs.

Interestingly, when I called a prestigious Hong Kong tea house to inquire about the 60’s cake, the answer was: we don’t have it, and there are no 60’s “pu-erhs” on the market! They tried to persuade me that in 60’s there were only Guang Yun Gong beeng, and why don’t I buy some from them?

In fact, numerous records have proved that the pu-erh production was never ceased, even during the turmoil of the Cultural Revolution (66~76). It was mostly for political reason that pu-erh production had to be continued to satisfy the need of minority people in Yunnan and most important, Tibetans: to prevent them from uprising or seeking independence, the first thing is always to make people warm and content! Hmm… how about learn some history?

This 60’s Ba-Zhong smartly amplifies the sweetness, the calming, and the mellowness of 70’s Jian Tei in an inconceivable way! Superb influencing and expansive feeling in the mouth and throat. Profoundly resonating inside the body, yet has a very silk and smooth texture.

Note: we used 8g for each table in the 5th International Aged Pu-erh Appreciation party, and each table sat from 7 to 9 people. So with 10g you can easily plan a tasting with similar headcount.

Each order is one 10g sample of this cake in a tin can.

About Hou De Asian Art & Fine Teas View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

100
93 tasting notes

Prepared 10g in a seasoned 200ml duan ni squat shi piao style Yixing teapot. Rinsed twice to open up and remove small amount of broken down tea dust (rinses immediately poured off – about 10 second contact time). I progressed each infusion by about 5 seconds, starting at 15 seconds and finishing at 2 minutes and 45 seconds on the 28th infusion. Heated enough water for three infusions each with a downshift of 10 degrees C at most. Climbed from 80 degrees to just before a boil for the 13th infusion onward.

Leaves are clearly broken down and fairly oily – pretty luster. Coppery deep brown color with hints of silver and far-muted green tinted brown. A couple golden stripes here and there. While there are a lot of intact leaves, there is also heavier presence of twig and what looks like much older leaves mixed in than most of the new puerhs I get. In a warmed pot, the dry fragrance is a dry but cool oak woodland leaf litter mustiness with a faint mineral and black pepper spicy tinge. Hint of ripe red grape skins in there and crisp sweetness. Wet aroma musty and heady with just a hint of an aged port aroma… maybe a bit of clove and brandy. Liquor color is a gorgeous clear deep red with gold tint to the margins. Liquor aroma transmits mostly sweet mineral aromas with that crisp, toasty dried oak leaf and bark aroma as a base. Reminds me of the smell of canoeing down a clean stretch of creek on a cooler summer day with the smell of river rocks, willows, driftwood, sand and just a bit of algae mixing in a warming, relaxing medley.

All infusions shared a base of sweet toasted malt, slight tanginess of mineral clay and tannic dried leaves, incredible smooth and thick mouthfeel, and sweet woodsy lingering yet clean-feeling aftertaste with an evaporative orchid-floral effect. First six infusions were markedly different in prime attribute expression. 1st – mineral clay; 2nd – smooth cabernet sauvignon (ripe red fruit); 3rd – old vine zinfendel (peppery and plum); 4th – sweet toasted grains and dry eucalyptus wood; 5th – home baked wheat bread just out of the oven drizzled with honey (camphor afteraroma); 6th – hummus on toasted grain cracker with a touch of ripe plum and pear and very thin slice of 1-2 year old creamy cheddar cheese. Fruits gave way to a bit of moist leaf litter and bark aromas in later infusions, but the floral and sweet, toasty afteraroma and taste kept going. While the telltale water chestnut crispness started advancing through the 18th-28th infusions, I gave up long before the tea did. Dunno how many infusions I could’ve gotten out of this guy… The next morning I re-rinsed and brewed two pots with the old leaves 4-5 minutes with near-boiling water and it still tasted sweet, clean and mouthwatering but most of the unique flavor characteristics were gone.

Used this as the representative of an aged sheng puerh for my Ten Famous Teas of China tasting, and I feel bad for the folks who had to leave before we started brewing this beauty.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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100
14 tasting notes

Super tea easily the best puerh ever created. I have heard people say that they prefer this to the red mark. I can believe it. Its durability is never ending I brewed this tea for almost three weeks.

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