Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea
Flavors
Brown Sugar, Floral, Vegetal, Cream, Eucalyptus, Gardenias, Mango, Passion Fruits, Peach, Sugarcane
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Ben Marcus-Willers (馬維彬)
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 15 sec 5 g 6 oz / 179 ml

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I have steeped this tea a few different ways. But so far, my favorite is gong fu style coming out right off the boil for 45 seconds on the first brew, 20 seconds on the second steep, and 45-60...” Read full tasting note
    95
    chriswilhite 36 tasting notes
  • “I purchased the Spring 2016 incarnation of this tea, and have now enjoyed it several times. The scent of the steeped tea is classic high mountain Taiwanese oolong: soothing and slightly milky. On...” Read full tasting note
    75
    mr-waffles 39 tasting notes
  • “For a key to my rating scale, check out my bio.
    This Formosan oolong, from the highest peak of Taiwan’s Li Mountan (梨山), is a great representation or standard for the Formosan...” Read full tasting note
    91
    benmw 45 tasting notes

From Red Blossom Tea Company

At 2600 meters above sea leavel, Fu Shou Shan is the second highest peak in the Lishan Range, exceeding Lishan (for which the mountain range is named) by almost 400 meters.

Because of its higher elevation and more northerly latitude, Fu Shou Shan’s harvest begins much later than most Formosa oolongs. At that elevation, strong but short sun exposure in the morning produces intense flavor compounds, while cooler mist-enshrouded afternoons allow the plant to store those compounds.

The result is an incredibly flavorful and complex tea with an amazing degree of balance and restraint, with absolutely no astringency or bitterness. An initial brew delivers aromatic notes of sugarcane and grass. Subsequent brews reveal more complex floral and citrus notes that bring to mind grapefruit, oranges and apples.

About Red Blossom Tea Company View company

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5 Tasting Notes

95
36 tasting notes

I have steeped this tea a few different ways. But so far, my favorite is gong fu style coming out right off the boil for 45 seconds on the first brew, 20 seconds on the second steep, and 45-60 seconds on later steeps.
I really like this tea. It has some honey/nectar to it. Nice lingering aftertaste.
Very subtle. You have to be relaxed and really put the time into it in order to “get” this tea.
And I really like Red Blossom’s ability to bring us freshly harvested teas.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec
asewonder

I’m curious to know what your tea/water ratio was for gong fu style?

Chris Wilhite

I use a small yixing pot. It’s volume is roughly 100 ml. I use about 7 – 8 grams of the tea kernels. I’ve learned to steep the tea a little longer, maybe even up to 60 seconds on the first steeping. You can do that with green high-mountain oolongs like this because they are greener. This tea in particular has a nice milky texture that comes out with the slightly longer steeping. Again, this is a very high-quality tea that deserves the time and patience.

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75
39 tasting notes

I purchased the Spring 2016 incarnation of this tea, and have now enjoyed it several times. The scent of the steeped tea is classic high mountain Taiwanese oolong: soothing and slightly milky. On the palate, I got quite a bit of florality, some fresh/vegetal elements, a light brown sugar vibe, and yet little to no milkiness. Very pleasant, but in the same genre, I still prefer Red Blossom’s Mi Xiang Tung Ting.

Flavors: Brown Sugar, Floral, Vegetal

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec 5 g 6 OZ / 180 ML

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91

For a key to my rating scale, check out my bio.


This Formosan oolong, from the highest peak of Taiwan’s Li Mountan (梨山), is a great representation or standard for the Formosan (Taiwanese) Oolong category. There is an incredible complexity and clarity in the layering of flavor notes. It is also more powerful or fragrant than other lower grade Taiwanese oolongs, and as such one could probably get great results with 3-4 grams rather than the standard 5. I’m not wild about the herbaceous eucalyptus notes strongly present in this one, but it is certainly a unique flavor and balanced by incredibly clear notes of sugarcane, mango, and cream. Red Blossom also sells a delicious Lishan Taiwan Oolong (picked from a slightly lower elevation tea garden on the same mountain), but the differences between it and the superior Fu Shou Shan are remarkable.

Flavors: Cream, Eucalyptus, Gardenias, Mango, Passion Fruits, Peach, Sugarcane

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 6 OZ / 177 ML

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