Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

Jasmine Dragon Pearl

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Rofey
Average preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 3 min, 0 sec

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “I always enjoy a jasmine tea whenever I'm out at a chinese restaurant with family or friends, and the floral aroma straight out of the packet took me straight back to some of those memories. I...” Read full tasting note
    84
    Rofey 14 tasting notes

From Send Me Tea

These sweet tea pearls are made with two baby green tea leaves rolled together and cured with fresh summer jasmine blossoms.

When steeped, these superior-quality new leaf tips have a sweet jasmine aroma and a flavor you can only get from the very freshest tea.

About Send Me Tea View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

84
14 tasting notes

I always enjoy a jasmine tea whenever I’m out at a chinese restaurant with family or friends, and the floral aroma straight out of the packet took me straight back to some of those memories.

I tried one-and-a-half teaspoons of tea per cup (250ml), which produced a pale amber liquor with a strong floral aroma. The tea was light on the palate, with a subtle floral-and-grass note in the finish (to be honest, as a black tea drinker most green teas taste a little grassy to me, but I don’t mind that).

My wife’s verdict: “Tastes like soap”.

My verdict: I enjoyed every last drop of the first three steepings – I would have gone for at least one more steeping, but time got away from me and soon enough it was time to hit the hay.

I was intrigued by how the tea leaves appeared after the third steeping. Rather than a pot full of enormous green leaves (like the oolongs I’ve been trying these past few days), the leaves formed a “twiggy” tangle, almost a sort of birds nest. Each “twig” was a pair of baby leaves with a lengthy stalk, which I found to be quite interesting. I wondered if this type of tea is typically like that, and I wondered if the amount stalk contributed to the (not un-pleasant) grassy note in the finish.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 3 min, 0 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.