1960s (early) Guang Yun Gong Puerh

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by The Essence of Tea
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This is a very expensive tea, so I wanted to be well prepared. I finished lunch 30 minutes before tasting, brushed teeth without toothpaste, rinsed mouth with plain water--didn't want anything to...” Read full tasting note
    95
    teaddict 311 tasting notes
  • “I decided to go back in time with this 1960s Guang Yun Gong that I picked up from David at the EoT. The dry leaves have a dark (almost black) colour with a red shading to it. The dry leaf also...” Read full tasting note
    90
    sammerz314 36 tasting notes

From The Essence of Tea

These early 60’s Guang Yun Gong display exceptional storage. The leaves are clean and vibrant, displaying just a very slight touch of frosting in places.

The early 60’s GuangYunGong cakes are the pinnacle of the Guang Yun Gong series in my opinion. Using 100% Yunnan maocha, very little (if any) of the process used to ‘pre-ferment’ the later cakes, and well aged, they display a powerful qi and excellent taste. They differ quite markedly in my opinion from the later 60’s and 70’s productions.

The price of Guang Yun Gong in the market is much less than other bings of the same era since the taste is not as complex or thick and hence not so highly sought after by collectors. From my point of view, this leaves an excellent opening for those of us who wish to experience the qi of these old teas without being overly motivated by complex flavour profiles. Nonetheless, this is still a lovely tea to drink.

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3 Tasting Notes

95
311 tasting notes

This is a very expensive tea, so I wanted to be well prepared. I finished lunch 30 minutes before tasting, brushed teeth without toothpaste, rinsed mouth with plain water—didn’t want anything to interfere with the taste of the tea.

1.4 grams of tea in tiny gaiwan
30mL water per infusion (used a very small measuring cup)

Water boiling or near boiling (205-212 per the thermometer when poured from the kettle)

Flash rinse

Wet leaves smell like forest floor—sweet clean compost scent

first infusion 15 seconds
earthy like the scent promised, but surprisingly strong sweet and spicy notes right up there with it

2nd infusion 20 seconds
earthy, caramel, sweet, spicy, very very very nice

3rd infusion 25 seconds
About the same as the 2nd infusion, a bit stronger is only difference

4th infusion 30 seconds
earthy, sweet, spicy, caramel

5th infusion, 40 seconds
Still strong and lovely

I have to admit to an ulterior motive here: I was hoping I might find that I actually prefer my young sheng puerhs to the ‘real deal’ of very aged sheng, since I have come to prefer them to most of the ripe shu—ripe shu designed to mimic the aged sheng. So I was hoping to find this would be a rather bland experience like eating dirt. And it wasn’t. It is lovely. It is very, very lovely.

Is it lovely enough to want to invest $$$ in drinking it regularly and in larger volume? Maybe not. I think stuff like this will remain an occasional tea, because even as it is sitting net to me in the cup, and the water has just boiled again, visions of Lao Ban Zhang loose mao cha are dancing in my head.

But do I understand why some stuff like this is praised and prized so highly? Yes. I get it now. It is subtly but dramatically different than the best of the shus I have had, because it manages a wonderful balance of the elements of spicy, sweet, earthy, fruity, more complex than I’ve had yet from a shu.

I’ll report back later when I see how many infusions I can get. Now up to 7, no surprises, still going strong.

Edit: got up to 12 with signficant tea flavor; by 16, it was slightly sweet water, still nice, but not a lot of oomph left.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec
Silver

It sounds grand. Thank you very much for the report. If you have a chance, could you post how many steepings you get?

teaddict

Edited to complete the infusions.

Thomas Smith

I have wound up tossing all of my money at any sample of older sheng I can get. If I have to eat leftover pastries from work as most of my diet so I can afford living expenses despite it, so be it! Hard part is justifying drinking these without sharing with friends.

the_skua

The first taste of aged sheng is memorable, isn’t it?

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90
36 tasting notes

I decided to go back in time with this 1960s Guang Yun Gong that I picked up from David at the EoT. The dry leaves have a dark (almost black) colour with a red shading to it. The dry leaf also seems to have a subtle spicy aroma and a large amount of twigs, probably more than in modern bings. I don’t mind this as I find it adds to the teas visual appeal. A quick wash of the leaves releases a beautiful aroma of spices, woodiness and bell peppers, an aroma that brings the 1979 Aged Beauty to mind. Very pleasant nose indeed. As one would expect, the soup has a dark reddish colour. The soup has a pleasant sweetness, which is consistent with the wet aroma, and mouthfeel. The soup seems to leave a long lasting lingering sweetness in the back of the throat. There is also an instantaneous hui gan. The cha qi is very apparent as a single cup of 40 mL has put me in a state of bliss. In conclusion, this tea is a joy to drink. It’s an example of what we all strive for when aging our own puerhs. Of course, this tea isn’t an everyday tea. At a whopping 5 pounds/ gram, this single steeping has set me back almost $50! However, I do think its worth to try. Easily a 90/100

Parameters : ~5 grams/100 mL brita filtered tap water
15 second steeps

Edit : You better believe I will be steeping these leaves 20+ times LOL!

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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