Golden Lily

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Low
Certification
Kosher, Organic, Vegan
Edit tea info Last updated by Roswell Strange
Average preparation
Not available

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We don't know when or if this item will be available.

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Uh, this is really yummy. It apparently fits right into my favourite little oolong niche of creamy yet savoury, not overly floral. It’s really delicious, not quite as creamy as a milk oolong, but...” Read full tasting note
    95
  • “2.5 tsp for 400mL water @90C, steeped four minutes Western-style. First, I have too much leaf here. Second, the water temp is too damn hot. I’ve got scalded and bitter tea here. Bleah. Still, I can...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “Another new tea! This one isn’t part of the Reset/Recharge Collection, and it actually came out a little over a week ago but between all of the moving craziness I just didn’t end up sitting down to...” Read full tasting note

From DAVIDsTEA

Sweet meets creamy vanilla in this delicate & uplifting milky organic oolong tea from Northern Thailand. Grown and hand-picked in the lush forested region of Chiang Rai, this rare and lightly oxidized oolong boasts a light floral aroma of sweet peas & apricots, and is prized for its luxuriously creamy notes. Re-steep it multiple times and discover how new flavours begin to shine through your cup.

How it tastes
Creamy and delicate, with the light floral aroma of sweet pea blossoms and apricot

What makes it great
This hand-picked organic oolong is made from the Jin Shuan (aka milk oolong) cultivar, which is prized for its luxuriously creamy notes.

This green-leaf oolong is lightly oxidized, so it’s more delicate, floral and fresh in flavour.

Re-steep it multiple times “Gong fu style” and discover how the flavours develop.

About DAVIDsTEA View company

DavidsTea is a Canadian specialty tea and tea accessory retailer based in Montreal, Quebec. It is the largest Canadian-based specialty tea boutique in the country, with its first store having opened in 2008.

4 Tasting Notes

95
4754 tasting notes

Uh, this is really yummy. It apparently fits right into my favourite little oolong niche of creamy yet savoury, not overly floral. It’s really delicious, not quite as creamy as a milk oolong, but more depth. If I get 50g of free tea and it’s still around, this is definitely my pick.

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85
620 tasting notes

2.5 tsp for 400mL water @90C, steeped four minutes Western-style.

First, I have too much leaf here. Second, the water temp is too damn hot. I’ve got scalded and bitter tea here. Bleah.

Still, I can taste a ghost of the lovely sample I tried at a DavidsTea yesterday, which was between a quangzhou milk and a tieguanyin. The DT staff tell me it stands up to multiple steeps and gets more floral with each re-steep.

Okay, as it cools, it’s improving. Definitely gonna use water at 85C next time. Can’t wait to try it gongfu.

This is a pricy tea almost $16 for 50 grams, but I think it’s well worth trying if you’re a fan of milky and floral oolongs.

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10265 tasting notes

Another new tea! This one isn’t part of the Reset/Recharge Collection, and it actually came out a little over a week ago but between all of the moving craziness I just didn’t end up sitting down to write the tasting note…

I think this is such an amazing oolong though, and I’m REALLY proud to have it part of the straight tea collection! It’s actually probably my favourite tea to have come out from DT since 2020 started, and of the new straight teas coming out for the year my favourite hands down! I don’t personally love DT’s Tie Kuan Yin and until now that was the only straight oolong we had for such a long time but this tea is so beautiful with a really interesting background! Basically, it’s a Jin Shuan cultivar green oolong, but with the unique differentiator of being from Thailand!

I love Jin Shuan/Jin Xuan so much as a style of tea that I actually have an entire unglazed pot dedicated to it – and it’s really cool to me to now have something that I have such easy access to, from work, that I can contribute to that pot’s growth and development. I know some people might ask why DT chose to carry a Thailand origin oolong when that’s an atypical growing region, but there are A LOT of other companies who carry Jin Shuan and in order to be competitive DT has to have something that differentiates theirs from the rest of the pack. So why not Thailand? It’s a relatively new terroir but the flavour is superb and not unlike what you would expect from Taiwan. Plus, if you’re a straight tea drinker, aren’t you curious!? I know that I was!

It’s excellent basically every way that I’ve tried it – Western, Grandpa, and Gongfu! Very smooth and forgiving/hard to brew incorrectly with a rich, silky mouthfeel. The dry leaf is sweet and aromatic with snow pea, creamy vanilla, and soft floral elements. I’d describe the flavours as creamy, rich condensed milk meets buttery coconut milk, with a side of fresh Spring flowers and a little, tiny hint of sweet pea. If you push the leaf a little longer/harder it almost has a fruitiness to it as well like white peaches.

I love this so much, and have gone through a lot of it in the last few months waiting for it to launch. It’s so good, and the type of oolong that I think can really speak to both flavoured tea fans and people with more of an appreciation towards straight and traditional teas!

Friendly reminder that I do not numerically rate DAVIDsTEA blends as I’m currently employed there and it would be an obvious conflict of interest. Any blends you see with numerical ratings were rated prior to my employment there. These reviews are a reflection of my personal thoughts and feelings regarding the teas, and not the company’s.

Michelle Butler Hallett

What does “Grandpa” mean?

Roswell Strange

It’s a more casual style of tea brewing where the leaves are typically tossed loose into a cup (without a strainer) and drunk directly from the cup, with water being refilled as the tea is consumed/starts to get bitter.

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