2016 The New Black

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Pu Erh Tea
Flavors
Earth, Sweet, Dark Bittersweet
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by AllanK
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 4 oz / 111 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “First, I would argue that most tea drinkers would be well-served to have this tea in their cupboard (ignoring the price for the moment). Additionally, my rating is accounting for the fact that it’s...” Read full tasting note
    78
  • “The first shu pu’er I’ve tried (also my first tasting note on Steepster). I’ve been drinking loose leaf tea for a few years now, but only become truly passionate about it in the last six months and...” Read full tasting note
  • “I found this ripe puer very clean in taste. The notes are earthy, woodsy, cherry, and sweet. No funk, dry, fish, or anything weird. It is also a ripe puer that doesn’t have wet storage, library...” Read full tasting note
  • “This tea tasted pretty good. The fermentation was not overpowering or fishy or even really unpleasant. There was a bittersweet note at first, reminding me a little of bittersweet chocolate. After...” Read full tasting note
    86

From Misty Peak Teas

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About Misty Peak Teas View company

Misty Peak Teas offers the world's oldest tea, Pu'er, as it never has been before. We connect the tea drinker with the tea farmer; allowing each person a chance to understand the many benefits and interests in this timeless leaf, as it was thousands of years ago. Misty Peak Teas is dedicated to providing the highest quality while allowing the farmer a fair value for their crop and the world a chance to enjoy an incredible pure tea.

4 Tasting Notes

78
24 tasting notes

First, I would argue that most tea drinkers would be well-served to have this tea in their cupboard (ignoring the price for the moment). Additionally, my rating is accounting for the fact that it’s retail price is $24/100g cake. For those wary of pile fermentation flavors and odors, this certainly is one of the easiest introductions to the style while retaining some degree of complexity. It isn’t too woody, malty, chocolatey. It’s a more medium-bodied shou puerh, with a limited but present richness and thickness in the cup, and pushing this tea doesn’t appear to draw out a great deal of bitterness. I really like shou puerh, but this one is nice for days when my palate is worn out or I just need a really clean shou puerh. I struggle to think of another ripe puerh I’ve had that was so clean, especially for its age. I probably wouldn’t have bought it if Misty Peaks wasn’t running a two-for-one sale, and I’m afraid that $27/100g including shipping is a bit too steep to buy another one, but I’m happy to have the two cakes for the time being.

Preparation
Boiling 5 g 2 OZ / 60 ML

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89 tasting notes

The first shu pu’er I’ve tried (also my first tasting note on Steepster). I’ve been drinking loose leaf tea for a few years now, but only become truly passionate about it in the last six months and been brewing my tea gong fu style since the beginning of 2017. I’m also still fairly new to pu’er, but I’ve tried about half a dozen raw pu’ers so far (mostly young sheng). This as some background to my notes.

Even in a warm gaiwan, the dry leaves don’t have a particularly strong aroma. I didn’t really spend time trying to figure out what the smell reminded me of. I was drinking this tea together with my mother and fumbled a bit with the gaiwan I’d given her as a present that same day, so what I’d intended to be a quick 10s rinse ended up being more like a 20s rinse. The smell of the wet leaves after the rinse was somewhat reminiscent of chicken poop, but said smell dissipated rather quickly. As someone new to ripe pu’er, this made me a bit anxious about what to expect from how the actual tea would taste like, but I try not to have too many expectations and let the taste speak for itself.

I brew all my sheng in a beautiful 250ml fully handmade Yixing clay teapot, which kind of forces me to use less leaf to water than many others do in order to avoid making the first few steeps too strong because of the minimum pour time it imposes. Therefore I’m not used to brewing pu’er in a gaiwan and furthermore this was my first time steeping shu so I wasn’t sure what kind of ratio would be appropriate for achieving the strength I want. I’ve heard a lot of people using 1g per 15ml, but I estimated a more conservative figure of 7-7.5g being a safer staring point for me personally. I ended up putting around 7.6g in the 150ml gaiwan and this turned out to result in a strength that was about the right level for the first couple steepings, with me pouring the tea out as fast as I could (around ten seconds total from the moment I start pouring the water in the gaiwan to the gaiwan being empty). I could have probably used a bit more leaf, say 8g or maybe even 9g, as at least this particular ripe seems very forgiving in terms of how much you put in.

As for the actual taste, describing this tea is very hard as it tastes completely different from any other tea I’ve tried, even raw pu’ers. I don’t know if this is representative of all ripes, but the language in which this shu speaks is totally different from what I’m used to. Contrary to the messy appearance (and possibly smell), this tea tastes very smooth and clean. The only word I can think of to sum up the general vocabulary of flavors it contains is earthy, but I don’t think it does a good job of conveying how the tea actually tastes like. The tea has darkish, mature earthy notes, which are often accompanied by a sweetness of some sort. The first proper steeping had a very dark liquor characteristic of ripe pu’er and a quite thick, almost syrupy texture. This very first infusion also was the only one where you could perhaps taste a hint of a medicinal quality to the tea and it had an actual mouth refreshing effect which you could feel as coolness when you inhaled through your mouth.

From the second steeping onward the liquor still looks very much like a cola drink or brown cough syrup from many angles, but when viewed horizontally in a clear vessel the liquid is actually a stunning shade of ruby red or even crimson red – almost like blood in a vial or a liquefied ruby. I wouldn’t say that there is a lot of development in flavor from one steeping to the next, but there are certainly many distinct different flavors present in this tea, they are just so close to one another that without paying close attention they may seem like the one same flavor over and over again. The differences are subtle, but they are they. Around the fifth infusion I also detected some underlying perhaps even floral notes peeking their head, but they seemed to go away again after that.

The earthy notes that are predominant for the first half a dozen steeps or so finally start weakening somewhere around the seventh or eight infusion, making way for a sweetness that is a different kind from the one that has accompanied the earthy notes in previous steeps in one way or another. I ended the session at the tenth steep at which point the flavor was clearly starting to taper out, even though the sweetness was actually still stronger than in other teas at a similar point when the infusions start to taste increasingly watery and you know the leaves are getting close to the point of being spent. As I have no experience on this matter, I don’t know if this is typical of shu pu’er, but I’m used to raw pu’ers having notably more longevity than this ripe at least. Not that ten steeps or slightly more depending on what you still count as tea and not simply water you’ve soaked some leaves in is disappointing, but I’m used to most pu’ers outlasting me instead of me outlasting them.

As far as bodily effects and tea drunkenness goes (as still a tea novice I dare not use the term cha qi as I’m not sure if it is the same thing), to again use sheng pu’er as a reference point (young gushu in particular), I’m used to suddenly noticing the effects of the tea around the fourth or fifth infusion. With this tea, the effect was a bit delayed, suddenly kicking in somewhere around the seventh infusion or so (I don’t keep tasting notes as I drink, not yet anyway). I noticed it first in my head with a slight lightheadedness perhaps and then in my chest and stomach. Not too long after I did feel a bit tea drunk for a while, but overall the effects were somewhat mild compared to my typical pu’er sessions with sheng. I’d just had a meal before the session, so I’m not sure if this had any impact on this. But aside from the more noticeable effects, the tea made both me and my mother much more quiet than usual. Not really tired but it just puts you in a state where you kind of forget you could be talking to others. You just end up sitting there forgotten in your own thoughts.

While drinking the first infusion and then again a couple hours after the session I noticed that the tea kind of coats your tongue with its taste that stays there for a long time, but you won’t actually taste it unless you wet your tongue a little, which is when you’ll be able to keep extracting the taste as long as you keep salivating.

All in all, fortunately this first exposure I had with shu pu’er ended up being a positive one. I honestly can’t say if I’d recommend this tea or not or say if I think it’s good or bad. I only really have positive things to say about it with nothing negative coming to mind. That being said, I don’t really have anything I could compare this tea to as it is so radically different from anything else I’ve tried before. I’ll have to drink it more to determine if I like it or only find it a pleasant tea to drink from time to time. This is not a tea I would recommend for those new to tea, but for those who already have some familiarity with raw pu’er this might be a safe ripe to try out as your first shu. Being relatively inexpensive and a quite small cake at only 100g, even if you end up not liking it very much at least you won’t feel too bad about your investment.

I’ve already ordered the popular 2015 Yunnan Sourcing Green Miracle (along with a few other YS cakes) and look forward to tasting it as my second shu pu’er. I will also have to try a Menghai ripe at some point as they are considered a benchmark of sorts when it comes to ripe pu’er. Will I become a shu drinker or stick with raw? Time will tell.

Flavors: Earth, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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1271 tasting notes

I found this ripe puer very clean in taste. The notes are earthy, woodsy, cherry, and sweet. No funk, dry, fish, or anything weird. It is also a ripe puer that doesn’t have wet storage, library book, rotting leaves, and compost flavors that some prefer.

It is a good new to puer tea or for someone who wants super clean taste.

Full review on Oolong Owl http://oolongowl.com/new-black-ripe-puer-misty-peak-teas/

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 1 g 1 OZ / 15 ML

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86
1758 tasting notes

This tea tasted pretty good. The fermentation was not overpowering or fishy or even really unpleasant. There was a bittersweet note at first, reminding me a little of bittersweet chocolate. After the bitter note went away a sweet note remained. Not entirely sure what to call that sweet note. Overall this was a very good tea. However, I have to question the quality of the fermentation. I eat nothing at all around the time I drank this. Something made me sick and it was likely the tea. I suppose I could be coming down with something and it could be a coincidence but I doubt it. Because I can’t be sure it was the tea I’m not going to lower my rating because of it. If it happens again the next time I drink this then I suppose I will be certain. I only gave this eight steeps, but I was using a big 220ml teapot. It would definitely have gone a few more steeps. Overall this was a good tea.

I steeped this tea eight times in a 220ml teapot with 12.6g leaf and boiling water. I gave it a 10 second rinse. I steeped it for 5 sec, 5 sec, 7 sec, 10 sec, 15 sec, 20 sec, 25 sec, and 30 sec. The tea would have certainly gone a few more steeps but I had had enough caffeine for the day.

Flavors: Dark Bittersweet, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 12 g 7 OZ / 220 ML

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