Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Bergamot, Cocoa, Malt, Nutty, Smoke, Sweet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by AJ
Average preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec

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  • “I thought I’d posted a note for this tea already, but I guess not. Full disclosure, I can’t give this tea an honest review and you can take what I say with a grain of salt, because this is the...” Read full tasting note

From Murchie's Tea & Coffee

A must-try for any fan of Earl Grey or bold breakfast teas.

Named for a blend of golden tippy teas, the result is a smooth, bold cup of Assam tempered with Keemun and Yunnan to add a sweet roundness to the cup. A touch of bergamot is just enough to enhance the natural notes of the tea, providing a pleasant aroma and a deep citrus note to the malt and honey.

Tasting Notes: A strong base of Assam lends classic notes of cocoa and malt, strong and full-bodied with room for milk. Yunnan smooths the base and adds cocoa, a subtle sweetness and faint smoke. Keemun rounds out the blend, strong liquoring but sweet and nutty. A light scent of bergamot brightens the blend, but allows the base to shine through.

About Murchie's Tea & Coffee View company

Since 1894, Murchie’s has been importing and blending the finest quality teas from select gardens around the world. As the decades have passed, the art of tea blending and tradition of excellence are handed down along with the old recipes. Today, Murchie’s offers traditional products and classic blends while also developing new combinations for a new generation of tea drinkers. We are proud to provide blends for events and occasions, from local landmarks to national observations and royal milestones.

1 Tasting Note

458 tasting notes

I thought I’d posted a note for this tea already, but I guess not.

Full disclosure, I can’t give this tea an honest review and you can take what I say with a grain of salt, because this is the first blend I created from the ground up and released through Murchie’s. So I’m a little biased and pretty proud of it.

I like earl greys, but personally, am not a fan of Murchie’s earl grey. It uses a lot of bright, light and brisk teas—Darjeeling, Nepal and Ceylons—with a very heavy dose of bergamot. I find it a tad too acidic, so I set out to make an earl grey I’d drink.

This’ what I ended up coming up with. Going the complete opposite direction, this uses Assam, Yunnan and Keemun teas. The result is a very deep, malty brew, with a bit of smoke, a bit of nut, a faint natural sweetness, and overall just very smooth. I opted for tippy Assam and Yunnan teas, hence the name. The amount of bergamot used is medium-light; I was hitting for a ratio that complimented but didn’t dominate it.

It does use artificial and natural bergamot, because the sad reality is natural bergamot oil lasts a whole month on tea before dissipating completely, in every test I tried.

We’ve been extremely busy at work so I’ve been spending a lot of long hours and guzzling Earl’s Gold a lot. I’ve also been bringing a lot of my work home (namely samples that need tasting), so I had this on-hand. I reach for it often enough.

Bergamot in the right context smells a bit like Fruit Loops to me, and this is one of them.

Flavors: Bergamot, Cocoa, Malt, Nutty, Smoke, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec
tea-sipper

Congrats on the first tea you created! It sounds like a good Earl. Added to wishlist. :D

EstrafaDC

Wow. This one sounds REALLY intriguing in so many ways. A smokier earl grey. Also, I didn’t know that about natural bergamot oil. TIL!

Roswell Strange

Congrats! Seeing one of your blends go from concept to finish cup is such a rewarding feeling! Also, I feel very validated right now because I also quite often get that “Froot Loops” association from bergamot!

AJ

Thank you. I’m pretty proud of it, which also means I end up chattering on about it whenever people make the mistake of asking.

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