Shangri-la

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Fair Trade, Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by Skysamurai
Average preparation
3 min, 30 sec

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  • “Shangri-la is defined as a remote, beautiful, imaginary place. So one would assume that when using this name for a tea they are suggesting it is a beautiful tea, with beautiful flavor. Utopian tea....” Read full tasting note
    89

From Rakkasan Tea

Grown in Ilam at an elevation of 4,900 feet, this certified organic black tea has leaves that are green due to a very long withering process that significantly reduces the moisture content and prepares the leaves for shaping. The flavor starts with a vanilla sweetness and finishes with savory notes of bacon.

About Our Nepalese Tea

Grown in the Himalayan foothills, Nepalese tea is extraordinary. However, years of industry underdevelopment, coupled with a decade-long civil war, served to stunt Nepal’s economy. Development of tea farming in the country suffered as a result. Since the signing of a peace accord in 2006, Nepal’s tea growers have sought to share their product with more and more drinkers around the world.

Our Nepalese tea comes from a small farm in Ilam, a region just 45 miles west of Darjeeling, at an altitude of about 5,000 feet. The region is semi-tropical and very sunny, but has abundant rainfall.

About Rakkasan Tea View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

89
640 tasting notes

Shangri-la is defined as a remote, beautiful, imaginary place. So one would assume that when using this name for a tea they are suggesting it is a beautiful tea, with beautiful flavor. Utopian tea. This unique tea, while classified as a black tea is more akin to a Darjeeling. Though all Darjeelings are currently classified under black processing they are actually processed slightly different and that is what leads to their uniqueness. The difference is in two parts of the processing stage: The wither stage, which is longer than black, and the oxidation stage, in which the leave will not be allowed to fully oxidize like black tea does. If one was trying to determine what type of tea this was simply by looking at the leaves they may find it tough going as Darjeeling leaves are greener in color then black leaves. This tea in particular has gorgeous rolled leaves of slight greens, browns, and whites. The aroma is simply, shangri-la. Pleasant and beautiful. The flavor is equivalent. Clean and refreshing with floral and slight vegetal notes. One of the main reasons this tea will probably not be considered a Darjeeling, at least for now, is because it is not grown in Darjeeling. Only a tea grown in Darjeeling can be called one.

Preparation
3 min, 30 sec 1 tsp

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