China Fujian Banyan 'Bai Ji Guan' Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Biting, Bitter, Chocolate, Cookie, Dry Grass, Floral, Honey, Mineral, Mushrooms, Sour, Butter, Cinnamon, Citrus, Honeysuckle, Lychee, Menthol, Nutmeg, Orange, Pleasantly Sour, Roasted, Round , Sweet, Thick, Wood, Apricot, Broth, Cacao, Camphor, Dark Bittersweet, Dark Chocolate, Flowers, Milk, Nectar, Osmanthus, Raspberry, Red Apple, Soybean, Spicy, Sweet, warm grass, Wet Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Today I pulled out this sample I received from derk, probably the last one if I am not forgetting some. I have never tried Bai Ji Guan before, but I thought it could be my gateway into WuYi...” Read full tasting note
    73
  • “Wow, life! I finally had time for a gongfu session tonight. This tea has really evolved into something special for me after unintentionally aging it (heh) for a few years. Spicy with sandalwood...” Read full tasting note
    97

From What-Cha

A much lighter than typical Yancha with a smooth floral taste coupled with sweet subtle mineral notes.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Floral taste with sweet and subtle mineral notes

Harvest: Spring, May 10th 2016

Origin: Xiao Zhu Lin, Banyan, Wuyishan, Fujian, China
Sourced: Direct from the farmer

Cultivar: Bai Jia Guan
Roast: Light (Twice roasted)

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 2-3 minutes

Packaging: Resealable ziplock bag

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

73
447 tasting notes

Today I pulled out this sample I received from derk, probably the last one if I am not forgetting some. I have never tried Bai Ji Guan before, but I thought it could be my gateway into WuYi oolongs, as I have had a little hard time with the more roasted ones.

In a preheated gaiwan, the leaves smell of milk chocolate, gingerbread cookies, honey and dry grass. After the rinse, I get mostly quite standard rock oolong smell – mineral with a touch of cannabis. In the empty cup, I can smell mostly floral scents.

The taste of this tea is very interesting, definitely different from any other one I have had. It is savoury overall, but with plenty subtleties. At various times its aspects reminds me of sheng, Dong Ding or Tie Guan Yin. I noticed flavours in the general vicinity of mushrooms, mineral and floral ones.

The mouthfeel is complex too. Honestly, I would need quite a bit more than one session to figure it out. The liquor is thick, soft and slick generally. I also get the a sourness at the very back of the mouth that’s characteristic of TGY. After swallowing, the sensation in the mouth is mostly cooling and a little drying on the sides, while fairly constrictive in the throat.

All in all, an ok tea, but frankly not the most enjoyable or memorable.

Flavors: Biting, Bitter, Chocolate, Cookie, Dry Grass, Floral, Honey, Mineral, Mushrooms, Sour

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
derk

For me, this tea seemed to be in the same taste family that What-Cha’s Amber GABA oolong and Indonesia Harendong #12 ‘Jin Xuan’ Dark Roasted Oolong are in. I can’t explain what that family is at the moment (foggy brain), but if you didn’t enjoy those teas much, I can see why wouldn’t be so into this one. The Verdant Bai Ji Guan was a totally different and expensive tea but worth a try.

Togo

I see. I can definitely observe some similarities between those. However, hat this Bai Ji Guan reminded me the most of is a light roasted TGY. But, I am not much into those it seems either :D

I have never ordered from Verdant, although I checked their selection at some point. What’s your experience with them? Do they present a good value for money?

tanluwils

I highly recommend Wuyi Origin’s Baijiguan.

derk

Togo, with Verdant, it seems like a good portion of the consumer cost is absorbed by marketing like the website and packaging, but what do I know. Verdant does have good yancha and the price range for their current lineup with some sale prices has about 50% of the teas at less than $0.40/g for 25g packages. They do offer 5g single-serving samples which is how I opted to try their a handful of their Wuyi oolong.

I’ve been wanting to order from Wuyi Origin, so it’s nice to see a recommendation, tanluwils.

derk

Old Ways Tea has some good yancha and can be more reasonably priced. Looks like they recently added this year’s Bai Jiguan.

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97
542 tasting notes

Wow, life! I finally had time for a gongfu session tonight.

This tea has really evolved into something special for me after unintentionally aging it (heh) for a few years. Spicy with sandalwood and camphor atop a thick, mellow, sweet and fruity base that’s almost like red apples and raspberries mixed with soymilk, white mushroom broth and cacao. Initial steep is still a tad drying in the throat, or as Togo mentioned, constrictive. That feeling fades out into a persistent warming, bitter, woody spice like Saigon cinnamon mixed with dark chocolate as a lighter layer in the aftertaste of red apples and lychee blooms ever bigger into osmanthus. At first the tea was very warming and caused me to sweat but that camphor cooling took over in the mouth about midway through the session.

What a damn delight! Interesting, engaging but not difficult or fussy — fun texture, forward top layer of spice and incense, subtle and complex with mid/base tones and notes, bright minerality, with every steep a slight change and nothing out of place. Still a soothing buzz, alert yet relaxed despite using a ton of leaf. Wonderful cooler weather, after-dark tea.

Speaking of leaf, I’m as in awe of these leaves as last time. They had been twice lightly roasted and before brewing look darker than other baijiguan I’ve tried; the spent leaf though is clearly baijiguan — very pale compared to other Wuyi oolong cultivars or varietals and possessing some beautiful oxidation.

After tonight’s performance, I’m not concerned about clearing one of the oldest teas from my stash. This one can obviously sit around longer if I can keep my hands off it!

[8g, 100mL clay gaiwan, 205F, 10s rinse (drank — yum!), uncounted steeps starting at 10s]

Song pairing: Biz Markie — Just a Friend
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aofoBrFNdg

Flavors: Apricot, Broth, Cacao, Camphor, Cinnamon, Dark Bittersweet, Dark Chocolate, Flowers, Lychee, Milk, Mineral, Mushrooms, Nectar, Nutmeg, Osmanthus, Raspberry, Red Apple, Soybean, Spicy, Sweet, Sweet, warm grass, Thick, Wet Wood, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 8 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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