Nepal Jun Chiyabari 'Shiiba' Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Apricot, Butter, Celery, Cherry Blossom, Chocolate, Cinnamon, Cookie, Cream, Dill, Earth, Floral, Green Bell Peppers, Herbs, Lemon, Menthol, Meringue, Mineral, Pleasantly Sour, Popcorn, Spicy, Spinach, Sugarcane, Sweet, Thyme, Umami, Vegetal, Astringent, Citrus Zest, Fruity, Grass, Green Beans, Orchid
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Organic, Vegan
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 5 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Oh, hello, and good day to you. Where do I start? First a warning: do not listen to music while gongfu steeping this tea. Or do. Please do. Second, a related anecdote. Working in some remote...” Read full tasting note
    99
  • “I’m going to be cliche and rate it in the 90’s but in terms of how often I drink it, it’s an 88. The mouthfeel is great, and this tea is great for the spring on a rainy day, or better yet, on a...” Read full tasting note
    90

From What-Cha

An experimental oolong from Nepal’s foremost tea producer, with a most unique story behind it:

HSH Himalayan Shiiba is made from tea trees that were originally from Shiiba village of
Miyazaki prefecture, Japan.
In 2004 and 2007 T. Shimada san, the family friend of the owners of Jun Chiyabari Tea Garden
since early 1960’s brought some tea trees to Jun Chiyabari from Shiiba village.
The late H. Shiiba san, college friend of T Shimada san, and the person who sourced these tea
trees from the surrounding mountains of his beloved Shiiba village accompanied him in the
second trip to Nepal in 2007.
In Jun Chiyabari these tea trees were called Shiiba Yama Cha to honour the effort of these two
gentlemen from Japan.
It was always the wish of the late Shiiba san and Shimada san to see really wonderful teas
being produced at Jun Chiyabari. They specially wished to see and taste delicious teas made
from Shiiba Yama Cha tea trees. Unfortunately a few months after returning from Jun
Chiyabari Tea Garden in Nepal, Shiiba san passed away in 2008 without seeing his dream of
Jun Chiyabari’s tea fulfilled.
For us at Jun Chiyabari it will always be a great regret that Shiiba san passed away before we
could make any tea from the tea trees from Shiiba and indeed before he tasted tea from the tea
trees of his mountain village deep in Miyazaki prefecture. It is therefore fitting that this special
tea made mostly from those tea trees is now called Himalayan Shiiba.
Life has a strange way of breaking connections but at the same time giving an opportunity to
those make the effort to establish new connections.
Like water
rushing down
the river rapids,
we may be parted
by a rock,
but in the end
we will be one again.
- retired emperor, Sutoku in Ogura Hyakunin Isshu
This tea connects in many ways. By producing this tea from Shiiba Yama Cha tea trees, Jun
Chiyabari re-establishes the connection to tea trees of Shiiba village; by drinking this tea, a
connection is made between Japan and Nepal, specially between Hile, the remote village of Jun
Chiyabari high in the Himalaya in east Nepal to the remote village of Shiiba in the mountains
of Miyazaki in west Japan. Most of all this tea connects the spirit of the Japanese and the
Nepali who love, admire and respect each other. That spirit brought the tea trees from Japan
to Nepal. Though parted by a rock for a brief moment, that sprit is made one again by bringing
this special tea from Nepal to Japan.
Lochan Gyawali
Managing Director
Jun chiyabari Tea Garden P. Ltd.

The tea is made using a blend of the Shiiba cultivar with others while propagation of the Shiiba is underway, in the hope that the tea will eventually be made exclusively with Shiiba. It has a smooth floral taste reminiscent of a high grade Baozhong.

I bought the complete production of just 200g, making available eight 25g bags.

Harvest: Spring Flush, 25th April 2018
Invoice: -
Invoice Size: 200g

Origin: Jun Chiyabari Tea Garden, Hile, Dhankuta district, Nepal
Organic: Certified organic by IMO Switzerland
Altitude: 1,600-2,000m
Sourced: Direct from Jun Chiyabari
Percentage of price going back to Jun Chiyabari: 35%+

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 80°C/176°F
- Use 2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 3-4 minutes

Packaging: Resealable ziplock bag

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

99
418 tasting notes

Oh, hello, and good day to you. Where do I start?

First a warning: do not listen to music while gongfu steeping this tea. Or do. Please do.

Second, a related anecdote. Working in some remote habitats doing often mindless hand-weeding, we had our share of field confessions. One of the stories that left the biggest impression upon me was a foreman’s stint working for the county medical examiner’s office. He found himself in this surreal moment, cruising across the Bay Bridge from San Francisco to Oakland on a sunny day in his work van with an unfortunate soul in the back, when on the radio this song came on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cXrEPNvRO8 There’s something special about crossing the various Bay Area bridges when there is no traffic. Time slows and the views always instantly take my mind places while a well of gratitude springs forth. This is how I felt drinking this tea. Transported into a surreality of life, death, soulful, uplifting happiness and deep, grounding gratitude.

The tea you ask? Okay. What-Cha provided a moving story about the origin of this tea. Did it influence my experience? I like to think not but I am human and no longer a research scientist with a flawlessly analytical mindset ;P

The dry leaf has that pungent dry desert earth smell I also found in the Rohini Bai Cha. That Darjeeling, spicy and pungent herbal musk. This is a Nepalese musk. Underneath are baby powder florals, cassia and chocolate. The warmed leaf transforms into spinach, cassia, cream, almonds with their skin. A hint of menthol? Rinsing brings forth cooked corn with the spinach, more cream, stronger white florals and umami.

The tea starts with a very pale liquor indicating the delicacy of the forthcoming aromas and tastes. Scents of baby powder and sweet lemon with an umami undertone transform into something much stronger and sweeter, more vegetal but never feeling like I’m eating a plate of cooked spinach. The tastes are very complex and also at first delicate with umami, sweet lemon, thyme, very light spinach and barely perceptible menthol. A lingering aromatic aftertaste of lemon chiffon presents. Salivation after sipping the first cup. Subsequent steeps bring forward a medium body with fantastic aroma in the mouth. Floral almond, light spinach, more sweet lemon and umami. A light bittersweetness in the back and an effervescent salivation. Thyme and other herbs in the aftertaste with that lemon chiffon.

Third steep has me revelling in this tea’s complexity. I note additions of green bell pepper and dill. The aftertaste has moved to a light apricot cream. WIth the fourth steep, the aroma becomes even deeper and stronger with a kind of sweetness that hits high and deep. Bottom of the cup aroma is a very sweet sugarcane, almond and cherry blossom.
And here is where I get caught up in the music and moment. A series of oversteeps, 3 of them, each several minutes long. The first one is bitter! but with an incredible sweet almond cookie taste. The second is less bitter, pleasantly astringent, still flavorful and aromatic in the mouth. The third brings out a strong buttery aftertaste. I get several more shorter steeps in, bringing the total to 9 with still tasty results, making me think if I were more mindful of the tea than my inner state, this tea would have a great longevity.

Overall, I’m really looking forward to the rest of this bag and sad that no more is available. Very aromatic and flavorful, high quality tea, kind on the stomach. Delicate and fleeting, moving to something more substantial and complex. I can smell and taste the grafting of spirit and tea, Japan with Nepal. I greatly appreciate the moving story that accompanies this tea. It’s an experience.

Edit: Note #400.

Flavors: Almond, Apricot, Butter, Celery, Cherry Blossom, Chocolate, Cinnamon, Cookie, Cream, Dill, Earth, Floral, Green Bell Peppers, Herbs, Lemon, Menthol, Meringue, Mineral, Pleasantly Sour, Popcorn, Spicy, Spinach, Sugarcane, Sweet, Thyme, Umami, Vegetal

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
ashmanra

I remember that song! Ha ha! Thanks for the trip in the way back machine!

derk

You know it <3

tea-sipper

So much What-cha Jun Chiyabari being drank today. :D

derk

It’s been a special day :)

mrmopar

I remember that song as well. Congrats on 400!

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Please keep things friendly and .

90
1099 tasting notes

I’m going to be cliche and rate it in the 90’s but in terms of how often I drink it, it’s an 88. The mouthfeel is great, and this tea is great for the spring on a rainy day, or better yet, on a sunny day as rays of light warm the lingering wisps of winter. My previous note pretty much details the tastes of this one, and it really does resemble a japanese green more than a typical oolong. It’s got the roundness of a great Sencha or Mao Feng, but it’s thick and slightly fruity enough to barely be oolong. Either way, this is for the snobs who like to reflect on the seasons and meditate. In short, it’s high quality, refined, and shway…

(Yes, that is a D.C. universe reference. I was religiously devoted to Batman Beyond.)

Now, to splurge on Rivendell, or not to splurge on Rivendell; that is the question. Whether tis nobler in the purse to budget the slings and arrows of a teachers fortune, or impulse buy against a sea of troubles, and by opposing, end them. To buy, to wait—No more and by buying to say we end the heartache, and the thousand natural shocks
that we are heir to. ‘Tis a consummation devoutly to be wished. To buy, to wait—
to wait—perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub, for in that purchase of tea what dreams may come.

This is what I do in my spare time: drink tea, write, Ham out-repeat.

Back to why this tea is good. Again. This tea is kind of unexpected, and then after a few cups gong fu, you might have something like this stuck in your head.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gte3BoXKwP0

Evol Ving Ness

Are you a Libra? Or a Gemini?

Daylon R Thomas

The exact opposite sign of a Libra, although I have a Libra rising, or Libra Ascendant.

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Please keep things friendly and .