Georgia Wild Black Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea
Flavors
Butter, Cacao, Cedar, Cherry, Cherry Wood, Citrus, Cream, Dried Fruit, Drying, Malt, Plums, Rose, Smooth, Tart, Violet, Wheat, Cocoa, Creamy, Sweet
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 45 sec 8 oz / 236 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This has been my daily morning black tea for over a week and I’ve almost depleted the 25g bag. This tea has bright flavors to wake up the taste buds, bringing some alertness to my groggy mornings...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “I’m probably going to rate it higher in the near future. Thank you Alistair for this great sample! So, I’ve found that wild teas tend to be fruity, almost no matter where they come from. Okay,...” Read full tasting note
    84

From What-Cha

A unique black tea produced from abandoned tea bushes which have been left to grow wild. It has a very smooth sweet taste with lingering stone fruit notes.

Tasting Notes:
- Good fruity aroma
- Smooth sweet taste with lingering stone fruit notes
- No astringency or bitterness

Harvest: May 2019

Origin: Ozurgeti, Guria, Georgia
Producer: Davit Tenieshvili
Sourced: Direct from the producer

Cultivar: A mix of the old Georgian cultivars
Picking: Hand
Processing: Wooden machinery constructed by Davit Tenieshvili

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 2 teaspoon per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 4 minutes

Packaging: Resealable ziplock bag

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

83
460 tasting notes

This has been my daily morning black tea for over a week and I’ve almost depleted the 25g bag. This tea has bright flavors to wake up the taste buds, bringing some alertness to my groggy mornings but the caffeine content seems to be on the lower end, so I find myself brewing an additional tea to take to work with me in the thermos.

Brewed western exclusively following What-Cha’s parameters of 2tsp per cup (8
oz), 200-205F, 4 minutes and I do a second steep for however long it takes me to get around to straining it, 6 minutes or more.

Strongish sour dried cherry at the forefront followed by some maltiness but nothing intense, whole wheat cereal flakes, cedar, cherry wood, prunes, both muted cream and butter, hints of cacao, sweet-tart. The butter and cream are deeper in the finish than while sipping. I get the feeling this tea is a bit more complex than my morning palate can discern. Second steep can get sandpapery astringent if brewed way too long, like 20 minutes. Otherwise, it’s a smooth, slightly drying tea and stacking both steeps in my thermos seems to take care of that astringency if I’m taking too long to get ready.

This tea is autumn and sweaters and maybe some old man and old woman. Good for these cool and foggy, coastal California pre-dawn summer hours. A lot like the Georgia ‘Phoenix’ Black Tea offered by What-Cha but much less astringent and red-fruitier in tone.

Flavors: Butter, Cacao, Cedar, Cherry, Cherry Wood, Citrus, Cream, Dried Fruit, Drying, Malt, Plums, Rose, Smooth, Tart, Violet, Wheat

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 45 sec 2 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML
gmathis

You had me at malty and autumn and sweaters. DEFINITELY my cup of tea, then!

derk

It’s not heavy with malt, more of a light to medium black tea. So much lovely tart dried cherry and prune. Tastes great when cooled to room temp, too.

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84
1124 tasting notes

I’m probably going to rate it higher in the near future. Thank you Alistair for this great sample!

So, I’ve found that wild teas tend to be fruity, almost no matter where they come from. Okay, overstatement has ended. I liked this tea a lot. Dryleaf has a little bit of the much desired and imagined cocoa-nib scent, and tasting it, it is very smooth and viscous, but light yet fruity. I got a little bit of plum, berry, and maybe nectarine. Either way, stone fruit and maybe berry. And yes, there is a little bit of cocoa in the aftertaste. It goes down smooth. I thought I was craving a greener tea this morning, but this proved me wrong. I could see this as a very good quality daily drinker…nevermind you would be set with any What-Cha tea as a great daily drinker.

I do think that Western was better since it is a little bit lighter than other teas, but it’s still good. Recommended.

Flavors: Cocoa, Creamy, Malt, Plums, Smooth, Sweet

derk

I put in a big What-Cha order — including Georgia Wild Black — this week since I was running low on black teas and these flavored teas I’ve been drinking are overwhelming. Good to know this one is a quality daily drinker. I’ve been doing a lot of western brews during the week since I have to wake up at 3 am for work.

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