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Wild Bitter Tea (Tianshan Lushui)

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Debbie
Average preparation
165 °F / 73 °C 1 min, 30 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This is very interesting. I had put off trying it because I was scared it would be too bitter, but it is "bitter in a good way!" It is a savory kind of bitter, kind of like dandelion greens. It...” Read full tasting note
    84
    LiberTEAS 4231 tasting notes
  • “I've been holding off on this one purely because of the name! LOL Today is the day I get daring! I will say it doesn't smell bitter...it smells like Dandelion stems! It short of tastes like...” Read full tasting note
    67
    teaequalsbliss 6770 tasting notes
  • “Interesting how steeping times and water temps can vary the taste. A very short steep makes a delicate aromatic cup. Longer steeps get the "bitter" medicinal brew. I get e twofer out of it: one...” Read full tasting note
    92
    jaygle 1 tasting notes

From EnjoyingTea.com

This is a rare and expensive tea grown in Zhejiang province. In Chinese medical journals the Tianshan Lushui is known to lower cholesterols and help with weight loss. This tea produces a green color liquid. The better its quality is, the greener the color. This tea has traditionally been used as a diet tea in palaces by the empress and princesses of ancient China. Because this tea is very concentrated, we suggest using one teaspoon of tealeaves for every 500ml of water.

http://www.enjoyingtea.com/wibitetlu.html

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3 Tasting Notes

84
4231 tasting notes

This is very interesting. I had put off trying it because I was scared it would be too bitter, but it is “bitter in a good way!” It is a savory kind of bitter, kind of like dandelion greens. It has a very pleasant – almost sweet! – taste to it. Crisp, herbal, and I’m really enjoying this so much more than I thought I would.

Definitely use a little less leaf than you normally would, a lighter infusion is better here. A short steep time is also recommended.

Preparation
165 °F / 73 °C 1 min, 30 sec

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67
6770 tasting notes

I’ve been holding off on this one purely because of the name! LOL

Today is the day I get daring!

I will say it doesn’t smell bitter…it smells like Dandelion stems! It short of tastes like Dandelion stems, too, now that I think of it…so I guess that is where the bitterness in the name comes from. I was assuming that it was be nasty bitter but it’s not that bad! It jumps back and forth and back and forth from a little bitter to a little sweet.

It’s a very unusual tea but I am glad I got to try it! I am also really excited because watching these leaves unfurl is awesome!

Not something I would by myself but worth a try anyways!

Cofftea

The Tea Farm sells this. Along w/ white tea it’s supposed to help lower body temp. I want to get some of this then blend it w/ white tea and pepperming and take it with me next time I go out for Mexican- I like to order things I need to sign a waiver for. :)

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92
1 tasting notes

Interesting how steeping times and water temps can vary the taste. A very short steep makes a delicate aromatic cup. Longer steeps get the “bitter” medicinal brew. I get e twofer out of it: one short for pleasure, then the long bitter for what it’s worth.

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