Yunnan Mao Feng Green Tea

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Doulton
Average preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 1 min, 15 sec 17 oz / 500 ml

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This is a very buttery and mild green tea. It's utterly delicious, however. The liquid is medium yellow and the taste is vegetal but not as strongly so as some green teas. Overall, I think that...” Read full tasting note
    92
    Doulton 255 tasting notes
  • “This is a favorite green tea. There is a slightly peachy/fruity/camphor note in this tea that is distinct from the nuttier edge of a Dragon Well. Also, this is a particularly mellow tea. It is...” Read full tasting note
    93
    teaddict 311 tasting notes
  • “A couple of weekends ago I waded through my tea and pulled out some samples to put into the "to be drunk soon" sample pile. This was one of them. My first thought was that the leaves are just...” Read full tasting note
    84
    __Morgana__ 953 tasting notes

From Norbu Tea

-Growing Region: Pu-Erh (Formerly Simao) Prefecture, Yunnan
Description:

Mao Feng translates literally as “Downy Peak,” and it is one of China’s most famous green teas, coming from Anhui province. Due to the popularity of Mao Feng style teas, producers from other parts of China make this style of tea and can sell it at a fraction of the cost of the ones from Anhui. That is the case for this tea. It was grown and processed in Yunnan and is referred to as Mao Feng simply because it has the distinctive long twisting leaves.

The materials used to make this tea are a mixture of hand picked one leaf/one bud and two leaf/one bud complexes. The leaves are simply twisted during processing to preserve the whole leaves and buds. When steeped, the liquor of this tea is pale green in appearance, and it tastes very fresh, green, and a bit nutty/sweet. The flavor is more assertive than other green teas, but I find it to be extremely smooth and pleasant.

Like other green teas, this one should be steeped at about 175 F (80 C) in order to avoid extracting astringent flavor compounds or scalding the leaves. I like to steep this tea Gongfu style in a Gaiwan, and if you are careful with water temperature it can be infused several times. I also like to just put a small handful of leaves into a glass and add hot water to it throughout the day…It is amazing how much enjoyment I can get out of this tea! Our Yunnan Mao Feng is perfectly suited for steeping in the western manner as well.

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5 Tasting Notes

92
255 tasting notes

This is a very buttery and mild green tea. It’s utterly delicious, however. The liquid is medium yellow and the taste is vegetal but not as strongly so as some green teas. Overall, I think that this would make a great introduction to green teas for those who hesitate: it’s got some veggie but not too much; it’s got quite a bit of butter, and it’s not at all fishy. Overall, it’s delicate and discreet, but not a simpering wallflower.

I would most certainly consider this to be a go-to green tea and will invest in a larger size.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 45 sec
Veri-Tea

I’ve had a Yunnan Green from Santion and it was really nice, I agree that it would be a good introductory tea!

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93
311 tasting notes

This is a favorite green tea. There is a slightly peachy/fruity/camphor note in this tea that is distinct from the nuttier edge of a Dragon Well. Also, this is a particularly mellow tea. It is possible to find bitterness in it, but you really have to try: very hot water or very long steeps or way concentrated. And it has amazing ‘legs’ for a green tea—I just keep going for 8 or 10 infusions.

I brew this one with a wide range of conditions: the leaves are so light and loose that it’s hard to eyeball accurately, but it’s so forgiving that I’m not often motivated to measure it. Anything from 0.5-1 grams of tea per ounce/30mL water, water from 160-180 degrees, steep time 15 seconds (for high concentration/hotter water/early steeps) to more than a minute (lower concentration/cooler water/later steeps). Its a rare green tea that even holds up well with brew-in-advance hold-all-day in the thermos.

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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84
953 tasting notes

A couple of weekends ago I waded through my tea and pulled out some samples to put into the “to be drunk soon” sample pile. This was one of them.

My first thought was that the leaves are just really, really gorgeous. They have a lot of color variation from medium-dark green to silvery white, and they are, as the description says, for the most part long and twisty.

The sample was in a sealed packet, but the plastic made it difficult for me to distinguish an aroma from the dry leaves. I find that to be the case with all plastic packets, not just the one this was in.

The liquor is a very pale greenish yellow, and the steeped tea’s aroma is faint and a little like sweet grass or maybe clover, slightly floral.

The taste is very light and mellow, not as vegetal as the only other mao feng I’ve had. I almost wonder whether the sample is suffering from age or whether my taste buds haven’t yet adjusted back from the lapsang souchong I had before this (I did attempt to clear my palate, but I might not have done a sufficient job of it). It’s tasting almost like a white tea to me, like a shade or two more intense than a silver needle. But with the same “fresh water” taste. The other notes on this found it to have a more robust flavor, so I suspect user error.

I am going to refrain from rating for now and try it again on a rested palate.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 1 min, 30 sec 2 tsp 17 OZ / 500 ML

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