Red Cloak Grande 2011

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by SPB
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 0 sec 6 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I've got a cold right now, so may have to revisit this when trying again, but I thought this was very nice - I was pleasantly surprised. It's so often that you find a vendor who makes exaggerated...” Read full tasting note
    92
    wyardley 4 tasting notes
  • “Deep, sweet, warm, complex aroma hinting cinnamon, sweet roots, apple sauce with an optimally fired toasty cereal overtone. Accents of moss and earthiness that are typical of high grown oolong...” Read full tasting note
    97
    SiuPB 45 tasting notes

From Tea Hong

The most revered amongst all Wuyi oolongs, Da Hongpao (translate: Big Red Cloak) from the pure pedigree grown in better horticultural environment mean significant difference and are most sought after. Tea Hong’s Red Cloak Grande is an extremely limited production (10 kg/year) harvested from two second generation noble bleed that are over 100 yrs old in the heights of Wuyi. Masterfully processed to best deliver the taste this name represents.

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2 Tasting Notes

92
4 tasting notes

I’ve got a cold right now, so may have to revisit this when trying again, but I thought this was very nice – I was pleasantly surprised. It’s so often that you find a vendor who makes exaggerated claims about a tea, and then the tea is not so good, but this one reminded of me (in a good way) of some other teas I’ve had and really enjoyed.

The aroma under the gaiwan lid was great, but the empty cup wasn’t quite as fragrant as I would have expected. But the tea was fairly durable, and the taste sweet and spicy, with just a bit of astringency and roughness on the front of the tongue. Looking forward to brewing this a couple of different ways, and definitely need to try the 2012 version, as well as get some more of the 2011.

The tea is described as traditional. I would consider the roast medium / balanced / sufficient (not over, not under), and I’d describe the oxidation as medium, but the roast is well done, and it’s been well roasted, so there’s no sharpness or unpleasant notes. Aftertaste is lasting, even with my nose partially out of commission, and has an interesting, complex flavor, and maybe some of the elusive ‘yan yun’.

Not sure whether this is qidan or some other varietal, and can’t vouch for whether it’s really from 100+ year old bushes, but I would believe that it’s old bush, at any rate. Regardless of what it is, my first impression is that this is quite a bit better than a lot of other yancha in its price range.

Preparation
6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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97
45 tasting notes

Deep, sweet, warm, complex aroma hinting cinnamon, sweet roots, apple sauce with an optimally fired toasty cereal overtone. Accents of moss and earthiness that are typical of high grown oolong characters. Dark amber stout infusion rounded with good malty sweetness in a silky texture. Slight citrus accents and immediate, tinkling spicy, bittersweet aftertaste.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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