Jade Tie Guan Yin

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Tapiridae
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 1 min, 15 sec

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From TeaSpring

Jade Tie Guan Yin is our highest grade (Tea King) Tie Guan Yin. The name reflects the vibrant color and beautiful shape of the tea leaves, each resembling a tiny piece of green jade. Tie Guan Yin from Anxi province is one of China’s Ten Famous Tea. It is extremely popular and can be found in the menu of most Chinese restaurants throughout the world.
Other names:
Jade Iron Goddess of Mercy, Jade Ti Kwan Yin

Taste:
Unlike normal Jade Tie Guan Yin, the dried tea leaves have very subtle fragrance. Yet, once steeped, the lovely orchid-like fragrance fills the air. Almost heavenly! It has a sweet honey note with a hint of floral taste. Refreshing, mild but lasting floral aftertaste.

Appearance:
Tightly curled dark jade green leaves. The infusion is yellowish green in color.

Origin:
An Xi (Gan De), Fujian Province

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4 Tasting Notes

90
1601 tasting notes

This tea gives off a gorgeous floral aroma when it’s steeping. It makes me think of orchids in the rainforest or a field of wildflowers or something. The flavour is equally fragrant and floral, and it slides along the tongue smoothly and sweetly without tasting too cloying.

The second steeping (@ 2:15) has more body and fullness to it with perhaps a hint of fruit in the beginning of each sip. It’s all very fresh-tasting despite the sweetness.

The third steep (@ 3:15) is a bit less floral and bit more fruity. There’s a hint of greeness coming in, particularly noticable when the tea was hot, and overall I think it’s a bit less sweet than it was in the previous steepings.

The 4th and last steep (@ 4:30) tastes considerably lighter, and I think I’ve reached the tipping point where the quality of each new steep starts being less than the last one – though I could certain still get one or two more half-decent cuppas out of it if not for that fact that it’s bedtime for me.

This is a great Tie Guan Yin, maybe not the very best I’ve tasted, but it comes close. The first two steepings were maybe a bit too floral for my personal tastes, but despite that I can tell that this is a wonderful, high quality tea – it’s in the leaves, the scent, in the flavour, everything.

I got to try this tea thanks to the Travelling Teabox and it’s tempting to keep it. But there’s not much of it left and the teabox is a bit short on oolongs, so I only took the one teaspoon and I’ll send the rest on down the line for the rest of you guys to enjoy it.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 30 sec

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84
89 tasting notes

Very floral aroma, but less floral, more mild taste. Hint of butter.

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec

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82
54 tasting notes

Tea: 4 g
Water: 12 oz
Dry the leaves were very tight. They unfurled nicely in the 1 minute long steep.
Light yellow brew.
Sweet aroma
Sweet flavor. Not bitter or astringent. This is an enjoyable tea.

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec

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64
137 tasting notes

This was pretty decent, not spectacular like other TGY I’ve had, but still decent. It did not last for many infusions thought, only about 3.

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