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1970s Pinlin Aged Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by The Essence of Tea
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 45 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The immediate wet leaf aroma is a very pungent sweet must and plum tartness with notes of truffle oil and malted vinegar. In the cup the liquor is sturdy and complex yet surprisingly light. Wafts...” Read full tasting note
    86
    robc22 144 tasting notes
  • “I posted on this tea at greater length on the EoT website, but wanted to make mention of it here as well. Oolongs were my intro to the culture of teas some years ago and will always have a special...” Read full tasting note
    93
    erichbenoit 7 tasting notes
  • “Exceptional tea. It's so understated yet full of aroma and emotion. On the nose there is a lot of cinnamon, and other spices with a lovely caramel body. In the mouth some of that wet leaf and...” Read full tasting note
    95
    ryanopaz 6 tasting notes

From The Essence of Tea

I came across this oolong in Taiwan, where it has been stored for the last 30 years. The storage has been impeccable – the taste is smooth and clean.

Usually with older oolongs, they either fall into one of the two extremes of being stored in too humid conditions or being too heavily roasted. Happily though, this one is perfectly balanced.

The caramel-like aged taste of the leaves comes through well and the qi is exceptional – rivalling even older puerhs. In my opinion, this is a perfect example of a nicely aged oolong.

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3 Tasting Notes

86
144 tasting notes

The immediate wet leaf aroma is a very pungent sweet must and plum tartness with notes of truffle oil and malted vinegar. In the cup the liquor is sturdy and complex yet surprisingly light. Wafts of bleu cheese and saffron mingle with cidery sweetness and a malted vinegar acidity. White wine marinated mushrooms. The hui gan is ambrosial, a definition of umami, enveloping the palate more so than the actual taste of the liquor.

When brewed stronger, a delicate and entrancing malt is mingled with the fruity must and peculiar acidic flavors. This one gets sweeter as you go. Bumped the score significantly.

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93
7 tasting notes

I posted on this tea at greater length on the EoT website, but wanted to make mention of it here as well. Oolongs were my intro to the culture of teas some years ago and will always have a special place in my heart because of that, however of recent I noted that my desire for them had begun to wane in favor of red or puerh. This tea however, changed this dramatically. I once again find myself looking for oolongs to steep.

While the aroma and taste of this tea are exceptionally complex (notes of roasted sugar cane, wood, earth…), it really is the effect of the cha qi that lingers with you at considerable length. During my first session with this tea, it sunk deep into my chest before radiating out into my limbs. It was so beautifully calming that I struggle to remember another time in my life that mirrors it. A truly outstanding tea that deserves attention.

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95
6 tasting notes

Exceptional tea. It’s so understated yet full of aroma and emotion. On the nose there is a lot of cinnamon, and other spices with a lovely caramel body. In the mouth some of that wet leaf and forest floor show up. Dusty minerals and ‘brown’ flavors linger on the finish. The best part though is how the finish lingers for minutes.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 45 sec

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