Fine Ti Kuan Yin Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Cait
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 1 min, 15 sec

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Pale gold--compliments the daffodils that are starting to stick their noses out in around the little stone tuffet in our new yard. Light and fruity but has a nice substantial weight on the tongue....” Read full tasting note
    gmathis 1690 tasting notes
  • “Oh my. I lump "oolong" and "green" together in my mind most of the time, but this tea may just force me to accept finer distinctions. This is an absolutely delicious tea, very sweet and flowery,...” Read full tasting note
    92
    Cait 216 tasting notes

From The Tea Table

Surpassing the quality of most of the commonly available Ti Kuan Yins, this grade from the Chinese Anxi County is a terrific value. Its golden-yellow liquor is smooth and fragrant, carrying a refreshing, fruity aroma as well as the sought-after orchid-like flavor. Use one heaping teaspoon per cup and steep 1.5-2 minutes in near boiling water.

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4 Tasting Notes

1690 tasting notes

Pale gold—compliments the daffodils that are starting to stick their noses out in around the little stone tuffet in our new yard. Light and fruity but has a nice substantial weight on the tongue. A small snifter of early spring.

ashmanra

Would this be the zombie bunny tuffet?? O.O

Jillian

…Zombie bunny tuffet?? 0_o

gmathis

Former owners had a decaying little two-layer stone flower bed (the tuffet). Perched atop said tuffet was a pastel blue bucket of unidentified mossy leafy stuff inhabited by a very … used … white concrete bunny with the paint chipping off. No eyes painted on it. Gives me the creeps, but we just moved it instead of destroyed it. Just in case.

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92
216 tasting notes

Oh my. I lump “oolong” and “green” together in my mind most of the time, but this tea may just force me to accept finer distinctions. This is an absolutely delicious tea, very sweet and flowery, and not at all what I expect when I think of green tea. Oolong, huh.

ETA: And it’s definitely getting juicer with resteeping. Interesting!

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 1 min, 45 sec
Cofftea

While there are green and dark oolongs, oolongs are definitely not greens no more than cooked Pu Erh is a black tea. I wish tea companies would educate themselves enough to not misinform their customers, that happens a lot w/ cooked pu erh/blacks. Now if I can just figure out what yellow tea is- I’ve seen it lumped into the white, green, and oolong categories.

Cait

Wikipedia suggests that yellow comes from a post-oxidation process, so perhaps it can be applied to a variety of teas that would otherwise be white/green/black?

Oh, cool, check this out:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/47/Teaprocessing-small.png

Cofftea

Freakin sweet!

Cofftea

I don’t like that they don’t call pu erh by its name, but oh well.

Cait

Hmm! My tea-of-the-month subscription is supposed to be one black, one green, and one herbal each month, but last month was a black-and-green blend, a fruit tea, and this tea, so I’m not sure how that works out (maybe one black-and-green blend and one oolong are equivalent to one black and one green? grin) — unless what I have isn’t the “variety” but the “surprise me” subscription, and I can’t seem to find the “you’ve got tea!” notice that came with it to check…. On Tea Table’s website, at least, green and oolong are not conflated at all.

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