Bitterleaf Teas

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drank Whatever 98 by Bitterleaf Teas
21 tasting notes

This is the oldest tea I’ve drunk to date and besides one semi-aged Xiaguan tuo my first foray into aged sheng. Perhaps my expectations were too low, but the leaves in the sample I received were larger and more intact than I’d expected; not that this is necessarily gushu or anything, but still. My sample consisted of one long, thin ten-gram chunk of the surface layer along with accompanying individual leaves. I’m not sure if the cake was just originally pressed loose or if it has loosened over two decades, but the compression in the chunk I received was fairly low. There wasn’t much aroma to the dry leaves, which obviously means there weren’t any funky storage related odors either.

I brewed this tea in a gorgeous new wood fired teapot I purchased through Bitterleaf Teas. It’s made from clay from Dehua and I’m dedicating it to aged and semi-aged sheng pu’er. Since it has a really fast pour, I used the same ratio of leaf to water that I would use with a gaiwan, so 12g to 180ml. I rinsed the tea once for 10s and after a ten minute rest I proceeded to do ten infusions, for 10s, 10s, 12s, 15s, 20s, 30s, 45s, 75s, 2 min. and 3 min. The rinsed leaves had a somewhat fruity scent of dark hay. After cooling a little the smell almost reminded me of an apricot pie.

As I mentioned, I don’t have much experience with aged teas, and as such I struggle with describing the first couple infusions as my palate was trying to get accustomed to the flavors. The first steep was fairly strong, yet gentle and smooth. I struggle with descriptors like woody, so I’m not sure if I’d use that word here, however I was detecting some smokiness in the tea and it made me quite thirsty without being drying. The second infusion while still having base notes to it also felt brighter in a way, to the extent that it felt almost prickly on the tongue.

The third steep was really mineraly, with an almost metallic finish. It was increasingly drying and also coated your tongue with a sensation that made you feel like it was burned. The mineral taste continued in the next steep, but this time merged with something else and perhaps even hints of cream. The mineraly nature was only ramped up in the fifth steep, which was super, super mineraly and almost too much for my tongue to handle.

In the sixth brew the mineral character finally settled down a little, starting to be about even with something else that was beginning to emerge in the tea. At this point I noticed this tea might taste better if you let it cool down a little. While the mineral taste continued in the next steep, it was joined by hints of some mineral sweetness that was starting to emerge. The steep was also very clean tasting in general. At this point I noticed the muscles in my lower back starting to ache and soon after I noticed feeling very calm and relaxed. The qi continued to move upward, growing more intense. It spread to my upper back, chest and head. It may have even made me feel a bit tipsy.

The eighth steep was similar to the last one in flavor, with maybe a touch more of that hinting mineral sweetness. At this point I was starting to get a vibe from the tea of it being somewhat medicinal, of it being fairly cleansing. I took my time brewing the ninth infusion, because at this point I was starting to feel quite tea drunk and my motor control was starting to be a bit wonky. The taste was still chiefly mineral, but instead of the prior hinting sweetness I got some of the earlier creaminess in the finish, which was a weird combination with the mineral taste. I should note this was the first time the flavors were starting to drop off a little as well.

The tenth steep was the last one I did and this was where the color started to fade for the first time, although this wasn’t reflected nearly to the same degree in the actual flavor. There weren’t any notable changes in the taste, so I decided to stop here, figuring I’d seen what this tea had to offer. The tea could have possibly gone on for an infusion or two, but that would have most likely required extra long steeps and I didn’t see enough value in trying that.

All in all an interesting first step into the world of aged pu’er. I generally don’t tend to like mineraly flavors very much, so the flavor profile wasn’t really for me. The flavors also shift very gradually without any dramatic changes at any point, so flavor-wise this isn’t the most dynamic of teas. I think rather than the flavor the cha qi is the highlight here, and although not the most intense pu’er I’ve drunk, I must admit I was caught off guard. I could see those seeking the tea buzz you can get from a young sheng but without the stomach twists drinking this tea. In terms of body the tea is fairly light and the longevity and the way it brews seem very similar to me to how a younger average sheng behaves. The tea brews a woody orange. Fairly light, nothing super dark. This to me would suggest that you could easily age this tea for at least another ten years if not more if you wanted to. How it would age, I have no idea.

Not the tea for me, but a valuable experience in learning more about pu’er and aged teas. More reviews of aged raws are to come.

Flavors: Cream, Metallic, Mineral, Smoke

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 12 g 6 OZ / 180 ML
mrmopar

Nice review!

TJ Elite

Thanks!

mrmopar

Welcome. You write much better than I.

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77

I feel like I’ve had this one in my cupboard for a long time; and I feel bad that I just haven’t gotten around to trying it. In fact, I probably would have continued to take ages trying it were it not for the fact that I let my little sister pick my final tea out for the night.

This was obviously what she picked; I think it’s the first time ever she’s gone for a tea that wasn’t flavoured. I’m almost 100% positive the deciding factor was the smoking monkey on the packaging. Now, I probably would have preferred to try this one Gong Fu but it’s just too late at night now to get into a Gong Fu session/commit to that much tea consumption. Plus, like I said, I’ve put off trying this one for so long now that even if it IS Western style, at least I’m finally trying this one!

So, here are my jot notes from the cup:

- I did forget to do a rinse; I’m just not in the habit of doing one with Western teas…
- Lighter in flavour than expected and very fragrant
- Thick mouthfeel and medium bodied flavour
- Body notes: apricot, peach skins, raisins, fresh clipped grass, and peat/moss
- It’s surprisingly sweet and bright!
- Top notes: raisins or craisins? Something sort of in that vein…
- Finish reminds me of lemon peel/zest; just a HINT pithy
- Also a bit herbeceous, especially in the aftertaste: almost a thyme like flavour?
- And then overall there’s just a very mineral/wet rock kind of undertone

I don’t know that it would be fair to say that I really enjoyed this one; but it was a lot better than I’d kind of expected it to be. To be completely fair, Raw Pu’erh just generally isn’t my thing – I much prefer ripe. I’ve noticed though that Yiwu pu’erh is probably as close an exception to that rule as I’ve gotten though: they’re generally fruitier and I can handle that kind of profile much better than I can other sort of Shengs.

I will try this one Gong Fu – but it may take a while for that to happen. At least, in the mean time, I can say that I have at least tried it in general.

MrQuackers

Try this trick for young puehr. Place a bit in a travel mug. Pour in hot water and seal up the mug leave it for a while. You should get something dark like coffee but with a lot of flavour. It blends those fishy notes and brings out fruit notes.

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90

This was an interesting tea. It started out with a light straw flavor with just a hint of mint in the nose, but around the 3rd steep it suddenly got quite aggressive, powerful and woody. Both guises were fairly complex and enjoyable. From the first, the cha qi was pretty close to overwhelming. I’m getting a full-body effect and general lassitude.

Flavors: Straw, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 g 3 OZ / 88 ML

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90

This sheng is very complex and had a lot going for it. I think that it’s exceptional, especially considering that it’s a higher-end sheng, and is a tea I would save for a special occasion. It was very fragarant, and was complex in a lot of ways. Overall, I would reccomend getting at least a sample of thist ea, becuase its one that I believe that everyone should at least try once.

You can read my full review here!…

https://www.theoolongdrunk.com/single-post/2017/09/13/The-Puer-of-Oz-By-Bitter-Leaf-Teas

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Floral, Fruity, Hay, Medicinal, Sweet

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 2 OZ / 60 ML

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78

Thanks to bitterleaf for this sample as part of the puerh TTB. I started by heating a yixing pot with 205 water and putting the leaves in for a sniff. I got wet wood, slight ferment, but not as strong as their black beauty. As well as dark fruits, or maybe overripe fruits.

Giving the tea a quick rinse, then making the first infusion. I got a dark clear liqour with a strong aroma of wet wood, wet earth, caramel and still dark fruits. Sipping it, produced much the same, sweet with a hint fermentation. Not too strong, with just a touch of sourness, maybe dark plums or something.

Second infusion was very similar with just a slightly darker thicker color, though even with a fine strainer, Im still getting a tiny bit of tea dust in the bottom of the cup.

Third infusion is slightly lighter as well as smoother with the sweetness coming up more and the wetness dying down a little , this is a quite nice tea. Smooth and sweet, but not quite as intense as the black beauty.

Recommended.

Flavors: Caramel, Sweet, Wet Earth, Wet Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 3 OZ / 80 ML

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78

Got this as part of the traveling sheng box. I started by heating the yixing with near boiling water. Putting the dry leaf in , I got a fairly intense chocolate and wet earth smell, also a bit of fermented aroma that you sometimes get with ripe puerh that hasnt come down a bit yet.

After a quick rinse, and just one as the tea seems very clean and didnt need more than one. The chocolate aroma became more like dark sweet chocolate and less like baking chocolate. Also wet wood and maybe caramel or dark fruit.

Tasting the first brew it was all chocolate, wet earth and wet wood. Nice but seems like a year or two in a dry climate would mellow this tea considerably and make it truly nice. Also its very sweet and quite nice as an after dinner tea to help in digestion.

Second brew was much the same although the wetness is coming down just a little at this point for more of a dark sweet flavor. Much nicer this brew, possibly 2 rinses could have helped this.

I have a feeling this is going to brew out many brews as the tea liqour is quite dark and thick, which tends to indicate a strong long brewer. This tea is really perfect with desert or after dinner to aid digestion.

Recommended.

Flavors: Dark Chocolate, Sweet, Wet Earth, Wet Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 3 OZ / 80 ML

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83

I’m surprised no one else seems to have reviewed this one? When I saw it up on Bitterleaf’s site I was FASCINATED by it. It just looks so… different.

And of course, I cracked the bag of it today too and immediately I was just drawn to the visual look of the dry leaf. It’s so weirdly shaped; I definitely see the “crab legs” comparison. The leaf itself is also weirdly tender/bendy – unlike tea leaf this has a LOT of give to it. I kind of just want to play with it, if I’m being honest…

So, I made this one up as a pot of tea – and originally I only steeped it for about six minutes because generally speaking that’s kind of my sweet spot with herbals/tisanes. When I poured my first cup, it was VERY mild/delicate though. Essentially, it just tasted like somewhat sweetened water. Which I suppose, in a way, it sort of was. I finished the cup and it was nice enough, but I was sure that there had to be some other flavour this tea could offer so I grabbed the tea leaf that I had just strained out of the water, and popped it right back in there to steep Grandpa style while I finished off the pot.

Even after a near hour of steeping, the liquor of this ‘tea’ is still practically clear like water. It has the FAINTEST yellow hue to it, but it’s just so soft and delicate. The flavour is like that too; just a very refreshing, smooth and delicate profile. It’s like sweet water, but now with the longer infusion it also has some very delicate floral notes and a finish that’s really raisin like. I’m actually really enjoying it, even if it is SUPER delicate/mild. There’s just something so unique and fascinating about it, too.

I feel pretty genuine in saying that I’m not sure I’ve tasted anything like it. It’s something I REALLY want to keep exploring/messing about with!

CWarren

I bought some of this too some months back but to blend in with some Jingmai sheng. It’s normally used that way more than being drank straight though I admit I will most likely try it that way too.

Bitterleaf

Glad you had a relatively positive experience with the crab legs! It’s a bit hard to know what to expect the first time. I recommend throwing some in a pot of boiling water for a few minutes to get more flavour out, similar to what you can do with lao cha tou or aged white teas.

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Backlog

I figured that I should catch up on these notes while I’m up early (by means not on my own freewill).

I hardly noted anything with this session, other than the flavor profile. I was drinking this at work in my Kamjove and working, so my mind wasn’t fully on the tea at hand.

Notes: Nice fully earthy body, with a reminder of a rainy Spring day. A lot of “earth” aromas and flavors.

89/100

Flavors: Earth

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78

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Flavors: Creamy, Herbs, Medicinal, Menthol, Orange, Vanilla

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 1 tsp 3 OZ / 100 ML

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77

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Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 1 tsp 3 OZ / 90 ML

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A comparative tasting of Plum Beauty Bronze vs. Gold

I was gifted either end of the Plum Beauty spectrum by a generous teafriend, so I did a side-by-side gaiwan tasting after two rinses, necessitated by the ball needing to be prized apart by fork after the first rinse and then re-rinsed on its essentially still bone-dry interior.

One thing was not expecting was that even at the post-rinse stage, prior to first steep, the odor would have led me to correctly identify which tea was which even if the leaf was not viewable. The gold has a most enticing aroma, while the bronze, not to put too fine a point on it, smelled like young pu.

The trend continued into the cupping – the bronze was certainly not bad, but embodied evetything about why I rarely drink young pu. It wasn’t bad, per se, but really didn’t bring anything much to the table that would lead me to choose it over even a decent, inexpensive oolong or aged pu of dubious material (hi zhuancha!). A bit rough, rather thin, altogether unprepossessing.

The gold, on the other hand, had a much fuller mouthfeel and left a nice aftertaste behind. It may have been somewhat overshadowed by my rather recent experience with F*ck What U Heard, which it simply isn’t on the level of, but it was an excellent drink and one which I am going to add a few of to the stash, as I expect it might be a splendid treat when I don’t want to mess around with separating something off a cake (or don’t have access to any more of W2T’s splendid but high-dollar beengs).

A definite eye-opening experience into just how much difference the initial leaf quality really can make.

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80

Purple tea is something that I think everyone should try, but not everyone will like. It has this uniquely vegetal taste that’s hard to pin down, and an odd smokiness that’s slightly medicinal, kind of similar to a middle-aged sheng, but not quite. What I like the most about this tea is how rapidly the flavors evolve from steep to steep, and how noticeable the evolution is. With most budget-friendly pu-erhs, the flavors evolve in a more subtle way until they eventually fade out or drop off, but this tea’s flavors don’t fade—it’s almost as if they’re replaced, which I find really interesting…

Read the full review at: https://shenggut.wixsite.com/shenggut/single-post/2017/07/30/Bitterleaf-Dragon-Blood-Lin-Cang-Zi-Juan-Raw-Purple-Tea-Spring-2015

Flavors: Floral, Pleasantly Sour, Smoke, Sweet

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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85

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Flavors: Brown Sugar, Dates, Sweet, Wet Earth

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 3 tsp 5 OZ / 150 ML

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79

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Flavors: Bitter, Floral, Menthol, Smoke

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 2 tsp 4 OZ / 120 ML

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80

I very much enjoyed this tea! A nice sweet character, but not saccharine. Bitter Leaf Teas is new to me but clearly one to watch!

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80

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Flavors: Astringent, Bitter, Creamy, Floral, Pleasantly Sour, Sweet

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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84

This tea was really good quality, and had tasting notes of medicinal wood and moss. It was a very full tea with a broth-like body, and left a sweetness in the mouth that reminded me of stevia. Overall, I’d recommend this tea to people who are new to the Jingmai region, and wants to try a jingmai that won’t hurt their wallet.

You can read my full review here…

https://www.theoolongdrunk.com/single-post/2017/07/07/In-Bloom—-Bitter-Leaf-Teas

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40

Earlier reviewer was correct in noting shellfish aroma, like a tray of shrimp the day after the party. If you can get over that flaw the underlying tea’s pretty boring and lacks the aged notes I’ve enjoyed in other mid-90s shou of less questionable provenance.

Preparation
6 g 3 OZ / 90 ML

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80

Great tea, pairs well with the common cold. A drink-now candidate for me.

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78

- good daily drinker when the rain starts.
No prominent aromas but a nice huigan can occour after a while.
Also probably a good and clean bridge Shou for Coffee-people.

Flavors: Coffee, Earth

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 1 tsp 3 OZ / 100 ML

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40

Earthy, smoky and sweet, remembering me of liquorice.
Images and more at https://puerh.blog/teanotes/2015-black-magic-blt

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79

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Flavors: Chestnut, Dark Bittersweet, Peat, Smooth, Spicy, Walnut, Wet Earth, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 2 tsp 4 OZ / 120 ML

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