Moychay

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Recent Tasting Notes

This is one of the more interesting and unusual shou’s I’ve yet to try, but then it is a huang pian version from a well regarded area. The flavor range was really subtle as shou goes. It would be possible to bump that by increasing infusion time but I liked it prepared in a typical strength, and it already had the most thickness and aftertaste of any shou I’ve yet to try prepared that way. Most of the flavor range is typical of shou, earthiness, underlying mineral, range that could be interpreted as dark wood or roasted chestnut, with one exception. An aromatic spice aspect that wasn’t completely familiar stood out, maybe sandalwood? That evolved towards an autumn leaf aspect in later rounds. I have no idea how this tea would change related to aging since usually strong flavors interpreted as fermentation related tastes that will settle are regarded as showing aging potential in shou, and this version is already on the subtle side while young. More in comparison review and more photos here:

http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2018/06/comparing-moychay-shou-puer-from-yongde.html

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Flavor aspect range includes a bit of petroleum or tar in the early going that transitions to roasted coffee, spice, and Guiness stout range creaminess after 2 or 3 infusions. Base for those more forward flavors includes mineral (along the lines of slate) and underlying dark wood tones. The tea is nice, but it might take a shou drinker to appreciate it. The thickness of feel is medium, substantial but not unusually so. Based on past experience with shou aging this tea might mature really well if those aspects clean up and settle into a slightly different form of complexity over the next two or three years. It doesn’t come across as murky or off, the effect as is now is clean enough, so I instead mean that the aspect set seems to enable transition to further creaminess and depth, possibly by picking up more spice range. More description, comparison review, and photos here:

http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2018/06/comparing-moychay-shou-puer-from-yongde.html

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A basic, sweet, clean flavored and mild shou. Complexity could be better but the flavors that are present are nice enough, earthy (of course) dark-wood tones over a mineral base with subtle transitioning traces of fruit, cocoa, and spice beyond that. The aspects are nice, for what is there, but overall intensity is a bit subdued. For someone looking for a mild, sweet, lighter shou it might be just the thing but more pronounced spice or earthy range might suit some, and this might lose intensity over time rather than improve character for being a bit mild now.

I bought a 2016 Taetea Menghai “Golden Fruit” shou version last year that this reminds me of. That “Golden Fruit” version seemed well received in online discussion because some people are on this page. For value it seems good, for relatively inexpensive and clean flavored shou. More comparison review with other versions and photos here:

http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2018/06/comparing-moychay-shou-puer-from-yongde.html

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A bit tart, with good balance and complexity. Flavors include dried fruit, warm mineral undertone, and earthy range that’s somewhere along the lines of pipe tobacco. I like the tea even though I usually don’t care for tartness in black teas. Dian Hong often include more cocoa and roasted yam or sweet potato flavor range but this one is different. I suppose that dried fruit and earthiness could also be interpreted as not so far off sun-dried tomato. I suspect this tea might be even better in another year since sun-dried blacks do tend to pick up a bit more complexity with a little age. It’s good tea, not great, but per my preferences good and also interesting in style, with nice depth and complexity and a decently full feel. Even for Dian Hong it can brew a lot of infusions, very nice brewed lightly (it probably wouldn’t do nearly as well made Western style), producing lots of consistent and pleasant infusions.

Full review here: http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2018/05/moychay-sun-dried-compressed-dian-hong.html

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drank Nannuo Sheng Cha by Moychay
15 tasting notes

I bought this tea in St. Petersburg over New Years and it’s coming up on a year old now, I suppose potentially transitioning a little. The main flavors are plum and white grape, with a lot of sweetness and just a touch of bitterness, but not bitter in the same sense a lot of sheng are, nothing like aspirin. It’s more that slight edge that one might experience from tasting a tree bud (hard to think of foods like that; maybe like an unripe peach, but different in taste). If anything this tea might be too sweet and mellow for some sheng enthusiasts, leading me to wonder if it’s really going to improve or if this isn’t the kind of tea you should drink within the first year or two. At any rate I really like it as it is, and it seemed a pretty good value for pricing that seemed moderate to me. A more comprehensive review is here:
http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2018/01/moychay-russian-vendor-nan-nuo.html

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73

At the beginning, very nutty and floral-vegetable with slight herbal notes, the aromas transform into a pleasant, freshly bitter-sweet blend with subtle fruitiness. Slightly light body and rather coarse in the processing but altogether very tasty and multi-faceted.
Images and more at https://puerh.blog/teanotes/2017-bangdong-sheng-cha-mc

Flavors: Bitter, Fruity, Herbaceous, Nutty, Sweet, Vegetables

Preparation
8 tsp 80 OZ / 2365 ML
Sqt

Oooh nice to see somebody else trying teas from Moychay :)

Alexander

some are quite nice and offer lot of value for the money (from the ones I’ve tried luckly the ones I got Bings of) – good Daily Drinkers :)

Sqt

Yep, I dropped by their teahouse in Moscow last year and tried a few, and left with a pile of cakes :D

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62

Heavily spicy, bitter-fruity, discreetly herbaceous and slightly astringent with very beautiful, intense citrus notes and a long-lasting sweetness.
Images and more at https://puerh.blog/teanotes/2016-meng-wang-sheng-cha-mc

Flavors: Astringent, Bitter, Citrus, Fruity, Herbaceous, Spicy, Sweet

Preparation
8 tsp 80 OZ / 2365 ML

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85
drank 2009 Ba Wang Shu Cha by Moychay
120 tasting notes

Super heavy, soft and thick, intense after dark chocolate with a distinctive bitterness and subtle sweetness. Without any trace of fruitiness.
Images and more at https://puerh.blog/teanotes/2009-ba-wang-shu-cha-mc

Flavors: Bitter, Chocolate, Heavy, Sweet, Thick

Preparation
8 tsp 80 OZ / 2365 ML

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55

Heavy and thick, bitter and earthy without unpleasant notes.
Images and more at https://puerh.blog/teanotes/2016-shu-neng-sheng-qiao-mc

Flavors: Bitter, Earth, Heavy, Thick

Preparation
8 tsp 80 OZ / 2365 ML

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70
drank 2017 Dian Hong Cha by Moychay
120 tasting notes

More atypical Hongcha – spicy and fruity without any great sweetness and without maltiness. Pleasantly bitter but slightly light.
Images and more at https://puerh.blog/teanotes/2017-dian-hong-cha-mc

Flavors: Bitter, Fruity, Spicy

Preparation
8 tsp 100 OZ / 2957 ML
john-in-siam

I was just going to add a review related to a Moychay product and ran across this. Which part seems atypical, which aspect? I’m not critiquing the review; I’ve not even tried the tea. I’ve just tried a lot of Dian Hong that spans a broad range and I was wondering which part seemed unusual related to that. Spicy and fruity would sound normal, although some spice or fruit wouldn’t be, and bitterness (astringency?) isn’t normal. If the tea actually tasted bitter, like aspirin, or young sheng, that would seem really unusual, versus that referring to a mouth-feel aspect.

Alexander

No, the teas is not as bitter as a young sheng but for a hongcha the bitterness is unusual and most Dian Hongs I’ve tried were more or less malty, this one has nearly no maltiness to it (which I like).

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85

This tea started out spicy, and had undertones of wood and moss. This sheng was lovely, and was very good quality (especially for the price tag). Along with this teas quality, it was full bodied and complex. It was full of tasting notes that kept evolving through out the session with it. Overall, I think this tea was great for what it was and I would recommend it, especially if you’re a fan of this region.

You can read my full review here:

https://www.theoolongdrunk.com/single-post/2017/06/18/NanNuo-Shan—-Moychay

Alexander

Thanks for the review! Because of that I discovered Moychay and really like those tea I’ve ordered so far.

mrmopar

I want to order from them so bad….

Alexander

as long as you don’t expect high end stuff I can really recommend even the cheap puerhs :-)

mrmopar

I am just looking at maybe a couple of cakes and a good range of samples.

Alexander

@mrmopar I’ve added the teas I bought, maybe those reviews are helpful ;)

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