Purple Buds Wuyi Black

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Baked Bread, Brown Sugar, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Clove, Dried Fruit, Fig, Fruity, Ginger, Guava, Malt, Maple Syrup, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange, Pine, Raisins, Red Apple
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
Boiling 5 g 4 oz / 133 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Yet another sample I recently polished off, this was an impulse buy shortly before it went out of stock. At the time, I was at least somewhat familiar with Yunnan purple varietal black teas and...” Read full tasting note
    83
  • “I had a really good experience with one of YS’s purple varietal black teas, and we all know I’m a fan of Li Xiangxi’s work, so I’m very hopeful for this one. Dry leaf: berries and hay In the warm...” Read full tasting note

From Verdant Tea

Only fifteen kilos of this unusual tea were picked in 2016. The entire batch was hand picked and processed solely by Li Xiangxi’s brother. It is a real honor to get to share the bulk of the harvest with you, and to try it for ourselves! The name Purple Buds refers to the color of the buds after picking but before processing. They are actually a light purple green on the tea bush and have a uniquely tropical flavor that sets them apart as a rare and intriguing black tea. We shared the bulk of the harvest in our September Tea of the Month Club, so only several pounds remain available.

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2 Tasting Notes

83
804 tasting notes

Yet another sample I recently polished off, this was an impulse buy shortly before it went out of stock. At the time, I was at least somewhat familiar with Yunnan purple varietal black teas and wanted to try a Wuyi counterpart of such teas. Like many Wuyi black teas, and especially many of the teas that I have tried from Li Xiangxi’s workshop, I found this to be a tasty tea, albeit one that perhaps faded too quickly for my liking.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a flash rinse, I steeped 5 grams of loose tea leaves/buds, in 4 ounces of 208 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was followed by 14 subsequent infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 8 seconds, 11 seconds, 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of raisin, prune, and nutmeg. After the rinse, I caught new aromas of baked bread, cinnamon, and citrus. The first infusion introduced a touch of woodiness on the nose. The tea liquor offered notes of raisin, prune, baked bread, cinnamon, nutmeg, and roasted nuts backed by a touch of malt on the palate. Subsequent infusions brought out a little more malt accompanied by notes of red apple, ginger, clove, candied orange peel, guava, papaya, minerals, honey, pine, brown sugar, maple syrup, and separate, more distinct roasted almond and roasted chestnut impressions. At one point, I also caught a fleeting fig note. The later infusions were fairly heavy on the minerals, but I could still pick up rather vague impressions of roasted nuts and malt as well as hints of fruit and mellow spices.

As mentioned above, this was a tasty tea, and I did find more complexity than anticipated, but like most of the Wuyi black teas I have tried, it faded a little faster than I would have liked. To be fair, that’s less of a knock on this particular tea and more a critique of many Wuyi black teas in general. They just do not often seem to have the longevity of some of their oolong counterparts. When this tea was good, it was really good, but I also cannot see myself reaching for it or a tea like it with any sort of regularity. Still, I think fans of traditional Chinese black teas would be rather pleased with this one.

Flavors: Almond, Baked Bread, Brown Sugar, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Clove, Dried Fruit, Fig, Fruity, Ginger, Guava, Malt, Maple Syrup, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange, Pine, Raisins, Red Apple

Preparation
Boiling 5 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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141 tasting notes

I had a really good experience with one of YS’s purple varietal black teas, and we all know I’m a fan of Li Xiangxi’s work, so I’m very hopeful for this one.

Dry leaf: berries and hay

In the warm pot: Marshmallows, crackers, chocolate.. mmmmmmmmmmmmm

Brewing at 98C with 5 or 6 grams in my 150ml yixing teapot.

Mmm, yum! nice, whipped cream-y decadence, and kinda like cheesecake, wood, grass/hay. Bready, a nice thick feeling in the throat, chesnut/peanut, it’s quite soft, higher grape notes as well, and very tingly on the tongue. It has the same weird fruit as the 2013 aged wuyi black I drank last night, more citrus in this one though.

Oh yay! this one has that lumpy thickness in the throat that the other purple black tea I mentioned had. I like that
I also feel a little drunk, everything’s a bit heavy and slow

In the later session, it became more of a fuzzy peach, with a tingle.

I approve.

Preparation
5 OZ / 147 ML

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